Results 1 to 3 of 3
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #1

    play of words

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentence?

    The speeches of Thucydides everywhere exhibit the antitheses, the climaxes, the plays of words.

    play of word = wordiness, verbosity

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 23-Aug-2010 at 15:31.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,447
    #2

    Re: play of words

    I don't think so.

    To me it means 'the skilful use of language'.

    Rover

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #3

    Re: play of words

    Hi Rover KE,

    In my humble opinion there is a subtle difference between “play of words” and “play on words”, which probably slipped your attention.

    play on words = a pun or punning = a word or turn of phrase with a double meaning, a pun or other humorous use of language.

    For example, Shakespeare was a master at plays on words--his dramas are full of puns.

    Here are a few additional words to facilitate your realization of my interpretation in my original post above:

    The speeches show Thucydides's amazing use of antithesis and the antithetical technique, which, though undoubtedly inherited from the Sophists, was greatly developed by Thucydides himself. The whole History is a study in antithesis. Thucydides himself does not conceal the fact that the speeches are merely literary devices, with his own best literary efforts concentrated there. He even personified different peoples by differing speech. Fine rhetoric, striking phrases, nice distinctions in meaning, and wonderful periodic sentences (again showing Sophistic training and influence) characterize his speeches.

    sophistic = apparently sound but really fallacious; specious: sophistic refutations

    fallacious = based on an incorrect or misleading notion or information

    specious = based on pretence; deceptively pleasing

    There is in my area a term as “ tricks of rhetoric”

    And yet, Greece is within walking distance from Bulgarian and you are quite far away.

    Regards,

    V.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 20-Jun-2009, 11:00
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 30-Apr-2009, 17:56
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 19-Dec-2008, 18:35
  4. play loose with = play fast and loose with?
    By thedaffodils in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 28-May-2008, 19:40
  5. 'play' or 'play on' the computer?
    By annliutaipei in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 28-Oct-2004, 09:15

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •