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    #1

    one pound of flesh

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    Shylock, …So do I answer you;
    The pound of flesh which I demand of him.
    Is clear;y bought, this mine, and I will have it…

    one pound of flesh = a debt whose payment is harshly insisted on; a legitimate, but tricky feasible request

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regard,

    V

  1. Tullia's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: one pound of flesh

    No.

    In the context of The Merchant of Venice, which you appear to be quoting, it is a literal pound (measurement of weight) of flesh.


    If you come across it elsewhere it is likely to be a reference to that and to mean a slightly vengeful, or possibly even malicious, insistence of getting every last thing you are owed, with no charity or mercy or wiggle room.

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    #3

    Exclamation Re: one pound of flesh

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    Shylock, …So do I answer you;
    The pound of flesh which I demand of him.
    Is clear;y bought, this mine, and I will have it…

    one pound of flesh = a debt whose payment is harshly insisted on; a legitimate, but tricky feasible request(that is either unable to be paid or one in which the payment is set to adamantly exacting standards)

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regard,

    V
    Yes, the meaning is correct. the phrase is from Shakespeare's “The Merchant of Venice”.

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