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    #1

    the power behind the throne

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    A long train of these practices has at length unwillingly convinced me that there is some thing behind the throne, greater than the King himself.

    the power behind the throne = the invisible power

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regard,

    V

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    #2

    Re: the power behind the throne

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    A long train of these practices has at length unwillingly convinced me that there is some thing behind the throne, greater than the King himself.

    the power behind the throne = the invisible power Yes, the real power rests in a person or persons who tell the king what he should do/decide. Thanks for your efforts.

    Regard,

    V
    2006

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    #3

    Re: the power behind the throne

    There are heaps of puppet regimes/presidents/governments nowadays.

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    #4

    Re: the power behind the throne

    The sentence 2006 posted here reminds me of a grammar rule. I can't name it. The rules states that where there is more than one subjects, whether the verb followinng it should take a singular or plural form depends on the nearest subject. If it's a singular noun, then it would be wrong for the consequent vert to take a plural form, as shown herer:

    There is an apple, three pears and two peaches.

    There are three apples, two peaches and an apple.

    My question is, should I put 2006's sentence as the real power rests in persons or a person who tells the king..., when the two subjects are converted.

    I know this is probably another of my silly questions. I've never seen these two words being put in the order I used in this post. I'am merely curious if this will do, should it be the case.

    Thanks

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    #5

    Re: the power behind the throne

    Quote Originally Posted by cubezero3 View Post
    The sentence 2006 posted here reminds me of a grammar rule. I can't name it. The rules states that where there is more than one subjects, whether the verb followinng it should take a singular or plural form depends on the nearest subject. If it's a singular noun, then it would be wrong for the consequent vert to take a plural form, as shown herer:

    In your sentences below, the fruits are not subjects. But I understand what you mean.

    There is an apple, three pears and two peaches. There is disagreement about this sentence; some would use 'are', because there are many pieces of fruit. One should solve the problem by putting "three pairs" first.


    But let's take a more difficult sentence: There (is)(are) an apple and an orange on the table.
    Some people would use 'is' to match "apple". But others would use 'are' because there are two things on the table.

    I think most people would say 'An apple and an orange are on the table, because there is a compound subject.'

    My question is, should I put 2006's sentence as the real power rests in persons or a person who tells the king..., when the two subjects are converted.
    'person or persons' is the usual phrase; I wouldn't put "persons" first.

    In the above sentence 'person or persons' is the subject of the verb 'tell(s). So, 'person or persons who tell...'. ("persons" is closer to the verb)

    Thanks
    2006

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