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    • Join Date: Feb 2010
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    #1

    over

    Dear teachers,

    I'm not sure about the meaning of "over" in this excerpt:

    "An astonising discovery was made a couple of years ago by a group of researchers from the Zoological Society of London, who went to Panama to investigate social life of local wasps. The group was equipped with a cutting-edge technology, which it used over 6000 hours to track and monitor the movements of 422 wasps coming from 33 nests . What the researchers found out, has turned upside down their and ours centuries-old stereotypes of the social insectís habits".

    Does it mean _for 6.000 hours_ or _for more than 6.000 hours_? Grammatically, it should mean "during a period of 6.000 hours", shouldn't it?

    Best regards,

    Giuly

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: over

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    It means more than 6,000 hours.

    Rover
    I would say that it means "during a period of 6000 hours". To mean "more than 6000 hours" it would have to read "...for over..."


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    #3

    Re: over

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I would say that it means "during a period of 6000 hours". To mean "more than 6000 hours" it would have to read "...for over..."
    That is also what I initially thought. "Over", at least theoretically, should indicate the lenght of the action of the verb. To "monitor sthg. over a day" should mean to monitor for a day, not for _nore than a day_, shouldn't it?

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: over

    Quote Originally Posted by giuly90 View Post
    That is also what I initially thought. "Over", at least theoretically, should indicate the length of the action of the verb. To "monitor sthg. over a day" should mean to monitor for a day, not for more than a day_, shouldn't it?
    Yes, that's right.

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    #5

    Re: over

    As you all said above, can I use the form "over period of time" instead of "for period of time" ?
    E.g: "over a year" for "for a year" ?
    I think it is possible but not in any case/context.
    Thank you so much !

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    #6

    Re: over

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I would say that it means "during a period of 6000 hours". To mean "more than 6000 hours" it would have to read "...for over..."
    You're right. I need to read the text more carefully.

    I've deleted my incorrect answer.

    Rover

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