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    #1

    who, whom, whose

    Well I have a grammar question regarding the "who, whom, whose" pronouns.

    So I stumbled upon a phrase today and I discovered I don't know whether the "whose" form reffers only to singular objects, such as:

    "Is this the girl whose articles have been published in Esquire magazine?"

    So this is a correct phrase. But what about this one?

    "Are these the girls WHOSE articles have been published in....?"

    Does "whose" have a plural form or it stays the same whether it reffers to a singular noun such as "girl" or to a plural form such as "girls" - in this case, the articles belonging to the girls or the girls' articles.

    Thank you :)

  1. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: who, whom, whose

    ***Neither a teacher nor a native speaker.***

    Whose is correct for both sentences (plural and singular).

    Here you can see the differences between whose, who and whom.
    This is the girl whose car was stolen.
    -> Whose car was stolen?

    This is the girl who stole my car.
    -> Who stole my car?

    This is the girl whom I stole the car.
    -> Whom did I steal the car?

    Sometimes whom can be replaced by who.

    Cheers!

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: who, whom, whose

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    ***Neither a teacher nor a native speaker.***

    Whose is correct for both sentences (plural and singular).

    Here you can see the differences between whose, who and whom.
    This is the girl whose car was stolen.
    -> Whose car was stolen?

    This is the girl who stole my car.
    -> Who stole my car?

    This is the girl whom I stole the car. "This is the girl from whom..."
    -> Whom did I steal the car? "From whom did I steal...?"

    Sometimes whom can be replaced by who.

    Cheers!
    .

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    #4

    Re: who, whom, whose

    Cynthia, perhaps you know that already but there's a difference between "who" and "whom" on one side and "whose" on the other. The difference is that "who" and "whom" always refer to humans, whereas "whose" can refer to anything. The following example is from M-W Dictionary.
    <the first poem whose publication he ever sanctioned — J. W. Krutch>
    "Whose" refers to the poem here. The poem is not a person but we can still use "whose" here.
    Last edited by birdeen's call; 28-Aug-2010 at 21:43.

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    #5

    Re: who, whom, whose

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    Cynthia, perhaps you know that already but there's a difference between "who" and "whom" on one side and "whose" on the other. The difference is that "who" and "whom" always refer to humans, whereas "whose" can refer to anything. The following example is from M-W Dictionary.
    "Whose" refer to the poem here. The poem is not a person but we can still use "whose" here.
    I knew that, but I had problems with its plural form. Thanks anyway. So kind.

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