Results 1 to 4 of 4
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #1

    split the difference

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    “You owe one hundred and ninety five dollars for that rod and reel and line” I told Johnson. “Well, its not right”he said. “But if that’s the way you feel about it why not split the difference?” (Hemingway’s “To Have and Have Not.”)

    split the difference = meet over a price

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Romanian
      • Home Country:
      • Romania
      • Current Location:
      • Romania

    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 1,948
    #2

    Re: split the difference

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    “You owe one hundred and ninety five dollars for that rod and reel and line” I told Johnson. “Well, its not right”he said. “But if that’s the way you feel about it why not split the difference?” (Hemingway’s “To Have and Have Not.”)

    split the difference = meet over a price

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V
    Hi Vil!

    Here`s something useful for you:
    split the difference - Idioms - by the Free Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

  1. Tullia's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Aug 2010
    • Posts: 628
    #3

    Re: split the difference

    More precisely, it's to meet halfway. It is most commonly used to refer to price, but could be used to refer to almost anything (such as the size of a slice of cake, for example) without raising people's eyebrows.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 52,575
    #4

    Re: split the difference

    Waiting for teacher's opinion.
    IMO, it means to divide the difference between the seller's price and the buyer's price in such a way that all sides are satisfied. E.g. fifty fifty.
    S.M.

Similar Threads

  1. "split" usage, what meaning about "split as"
    By jsan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 19-Jan-2010, 11:55
  2. [General] be split about=?
    By thedaffodils in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-Jul-2008, 13:07
  3. split a fare / split the fare
    By siruss in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 29-Jul-2007, 05:53
  4. split up
    By kohyoongliat in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-Apr-2007, 04:49
  5. to often split infinitives?
    By dihen in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 21-Jan-2007, 06:44

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •