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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
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      • Bulgaria
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      • Bulgaria

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    #1

    one's dish of tea

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    You know if you wouldn’t interrupt me every morning, I think I’d fall in love with you.
    You would never have been my dish of tea… (Helman’s “The Autumn Garden” act II, sc.1)

    one’s dish of tea = just the man for me = it is at all my ticket

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 31-Aug-2010 at 09:28.

  1. Tullia's Avatar
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      • England
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      • England

    • Join Date: Aug 2010
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    #2

    Re: one's dish of tea

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    You know if you wouldn’t interrupt me every morning, I think I’d fall in love with you.
    You would never have been my dish of tea… (Helman’s “The Autumn Garden” act II, sc.1)

    one’s dish of tea = just the man for me = it is at all my ticket

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    Your interpretation certainly seems correct based on the limited context you've posted. I think nowadays we would be more likely to say "my cup of tea" instead though - probably just a result of vocabulary changing over time, or possibly a regional variation? Br Eng, which is my native tongue, is almost exclusively "cup of tea" nowdays though. Also, on the web, it is certainly vastly more common (see here) so I suspect Am Eng uses it too.


    ===


    As an aside, while I understand what you mean by your expression "it is at all my ticket" it's not really idiomatic. We would, I would say, describe things as "just the ticket" instead. See here.

  2. riquecohen's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • American English
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      • United States
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      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Aug 2010
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    #3

    Re: one's dish of tea

    "Not my cup of tea" is used in American English, as well.

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