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    #1

    About 'Off'

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    "This young lady is your friend? Miss Sharp, I am very happy to see you. Have you and Emmy been quarrelling already with Joseph, that he wants to be off?"

    be off = leave, depart

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    re: About 'Off'

    Yes.

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    #3

    be off - 2

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    I'm sorry, the lamb is off, may I suggest some chicken?

    be off = end (about eating in a restaurant)

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 03-Sep-2010 at 07:00.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: be off - 2

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    I'm sorry, the lamb is off, may I suggest some chicken?

    be off = end (about eating in a restaurant)

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    If the waiter says "Sorry, the lamb's off", it means they don't have any (or at least they're not prepared to sell it to you!). It's short for "off the menu", whereas the food that you can order is "on the menu".

    Of course, if the lamb has already been served and the customer calls the waiter over to say "Excuse me, the lamb's off", it has a totally different meaning. It means that the food has gone bad, spoiled, rotten, mouldy etc!

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    #5

    be off - 3

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    This fish is off. I won't buy it, I do not buy it.

    be off = spoiled (of food)

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: be off - 3

    Yes. Coincidentally, I just added this definition to your "be off - 2" post.

  4. MASM's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: be off - 2

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    If the waiter says "Sorry, the lamb's off", it means they don't have any (or at least they're not prepared to sell it to you!). It's short for "off the menu", whereas the food that you can order is "on the menu".
    This context is clear. Although I was wondering if you could use "off the menu" to refer to dishes that are not written on the menu but they can offer them to you at the restaurant on a specific day.
    They sometimes do that where I live and I'd like to know if you'd use it that way.

    For example: " We've got lamb chops in tomato sauce but also off the menu we've got garlic chicken"

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    #8

    be off - 4

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    I'm off at 6.00; let's meet then/let us look around at this time

    be off = released from work

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 03-Sep-2010 at 07:01.

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    #9

    be off - 5

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    Oh dear, Father's off again on his favorite subject-himself!

    be off = colloq . create a plate, (begin a long talk on some topic)

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

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    #10

    be off - 6

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?
    How are you off for clothes?
    be off = colloq . squirrel

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V

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