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  1. beachboy's Avatar
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    #1

    on the bus

    Is it ever possible to say The students are in the bus? Is there an explanation?

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    #2

    Re: on the bus

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    Is it ever possible to say The students are in the bus? Is there an explanation?
    The general rule is "on" a bus, train or plane and "in" a car (automobile) or taxi regardless of whether you are referring to a person or an object.

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    #3

    Re: on the bus

    Are there any situations in which one can only be said to be in the bus, instead of on the bus?

    Thanks

    Richard

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    #4

    Re: on the bus

    Quote Originally Posted by cubezero3 View Post
    Are there any situations in which one can only be said to be in the bus, instead of on the bus?

    Thanks

    Richard
    "Situations in which one can ONLY be said to be in the bus??" I can't think of any. 99% of the time in AmE you will hear "on".

  2. Senior Member
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    #5

    Re: on the bus

    A learner

    People are always on the bus.
    The passengers are always on the plane even though they are actually at the fuselage, I mean in the passenger's cabin. (on the seats, in the chairs)

  3. beachboy's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: on the bus

    Is there an explanation for this? I mean, is it something that can mislead children sometimes?

  4. Senior Member
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    #7

    Re: on the bus

    A learner

    I am not sure.
    Might be because the passenger should get on board when entering either a bus or plane.
    An officer usually board them on.

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    #8

    Re: on the bus

    is it something that can mislead children sometimes?
    Oh, yes, beachboy - it can certainly confuse children and students of the language.

    But surely Portuguese also has tricky constructions and prepositions to mislead the learner.

    Rover

  5. beachboy's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: on the bus

    You bet! Prepositions, for example, are always terrible!

  6. philadelphia's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: on the bus

    *Not a teacher

    If you really ever would like to make a difference between in and on, the following could be worth reading:

    In a bus: when the bus is not moving or has not moved yet.
    On a bus: when the bus is moving.

    However, on is definitely more common. I personally only heard on in the UK, so I would advise you to use on in almost any context.
    Last edited by philadelphia; 10-Sep-2010 at 13:50. Reason: Typo

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