Results 1 to 2 of 2
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 363
    #1

    Either A, B, or C?

    According to Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, "either" means one or the other of two things or people.

    I can say, "You can take either A or B."

    How do you say, if there are more than two things?

    I don't think "either" can be used.
    Can I say, "You can take A or B or C or D"?
    or "You can take A, B, C, or D"?

    If I say, "A, B, C, or D," do people misunderstand that it means "A+B+C or C"?

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,822
    #2

    Re: Either A, B, or C?

    Quote Originally Posted by Snappy View Post
    According to Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, "either" means one or the other of two things or people.

    I can say, "You can take either A or B."

    How do you say, if there are more than two things?

    I don't think "either" can be used.
    Can I say, "You can take A or B or C or D"?
    or "You can take A, B, C, or D"?

    If I say, "A, B, C, or D," do people misunderstand that it means "A+B+C or C"?
    "A+B+C or D" would be : "You can take A, B and C together, or D".

    If you just put "You can take A, B and C, or D" it might be understood as "A, B+C together, or D."

    You could say "You can choose between/from A, B, C and D."

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •