Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. Nightmare85's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,333
    #1

    Know or have known?

    Hello guys,
    Which sentence is correct?
    I know her longer than you do.
    I have known her longer than you have.

    Of course you can't say:
    I know her for some weeks.
    (At least it doesn't make much sense.)
    But is it the same case for the above situation?

    Cheers!

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,216
    #2

    Re: Know or have known?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Hello guys,
    Which sentence is correct?
    I know her longer than you do.
    I have known her longer than you have.

    Of course you can't say:
    I know her for some weeks.
    (At least it doesn't make much sense.)
    But is it the same case for the above situation?

    Cheers!
    Do you see why?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. Nightmare85's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,333
    #3

    Re: Know or have known?

    Thank you.

    Well, I guess it's because we say, "I've known him/her" if you want to tell others a time span!?

    Cheers!

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,216
    #4

    Re: Know or have known?

    Right - time span.

    "I know her BETTER than you do" is okay, though. It's about this moment in time.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 4,146
    #5

    Re: Know or have known?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Hello guys,
    Which sentence is correct?
    I know her longer than you do. The meaning of this sentence is very clear.
    I know her (for a) longer (time) than you do. (present tense for a present fact)
    I know her better (than you do), but you know her longer. (present facts)

    I have known her longer than you have. This may be more common, but is the first sentence wrong?


    Cheers!
    2006

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,216
    #6

    Re: Know or have known?

    I'd say yes, it's wrong.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  6. Nightmare85's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,333
    #7

    Re: Know or have known?

    I think we can say:

    I play tennis longer than you do.
    -> You still play tennis.
    I've played tennis longer than you have.
    -> Pretty much the same meaning.

    I know her longer than you do.
    -> You only get somebody to know once. (Usually).
    -> That's why I believe this sentence is not meaningful.
    I have known her longer than you have.
    -> This is okay!

    Does this help?:
    I have been knowing her for some weeks.
    Makes no sense, even if, it would mean something like:
    I've been trying to get her to know for some weeks.

    I'm not sure if the last example makes it clear, though...

    Cheers!

  7. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,216
    #8

    Re: Know or have known?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    I think we can say:

    I play tennis longer than you do.
    This works only if every week, you play for two hours and I play for only one. You play longer than I do (habitually).

    Otherwise, I've played is the version you want.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 4,146
    #9

    Re: Know or have known?

    [QUOTE=Nightmare85;650248]

    [COLOR=Black]I know her longer than you do.
    -> You only get somebody to know once. (Usually). "longer" doesn't relate to how many times. It relates to duration.
    -> That's why I believe this sentence is not meaningful. It is meaningful.

    2006

  8. Nightmare85's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,333
    #10

    Re: Know or have known?

    Okay, let's try again:
    Would you say:
    I know her for a long time.
    Or:
    I have known her for a long time.


    I believe you would not use sentence 1.

    I play tennis for a long time.
    I have played tennis for a long time.
    Both sentences are okay, depending on what you want to say.

    You can say, "I know her.", yes, this makes it clear that you know her.
    But how can you compare whether you know her longer than someone does?
    You can say, "I know her better than you do.", but certainly not, "I know her longer than you do."
    This is why only "I have known her longer than you have" makes sense to me.
    Q: How long have you known her?
    Q: How well do you know her?
    A: See above.

    Cheers!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •