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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    You are like a guru "to/for" me?

    Hi. Can you please help me find what is the correct form?
    "you are like a guru to me" or "you are like a guru for me"

  2. Tullia's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: You are like a guru "to/for" me?

    Quote Originally Posted by Aidi View Post
    Hi. Can you please help me find what is the correct form?
    "you are like a guru to me" or "you are like a guru for me"

    "To me" sounds more natural to my Br Eng-attuned ear, but I don't have a significant problem with "for me" either.

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    #3

    Re: You are like a guru "to/for" me?

    Only to me works for me.

    Rover

  3. Tullia's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: You are like a guru "to/for" me?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Only to me works for me.

    Rover
    I can just about mentally hear it said if the emphasis is on the me rather than the noun.

    You've been like a second father for me.
    You are like a guru for me, I read your articles every week.

    He was like a hero for me.


    I still prefer "to" (which is probably more grammatically correct). That said, the whole "like... to (or for)" is really redundant in almost all the examples of which I can think. I think I'd prefer to say:
    You are a guru to me.
    You have been a second father for me.

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