Results 1 to 2 of 2
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #1

    gap-toothed

    Dear teachers,


    Would you tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences?


    Two big gold caps shone brightly in his wide, gap-toothed grin.
    The régisseur hesitated, then smiled a slow gap-toothed smile.
    Suzie gives him her best, gap-toothed smile, and then comes forward to take the gleaming chrome wheel, as Sam scrambles up on deck, kneeling where Ray had knelled before him to set the jib.
    Alfred E. Neuman is the gap-toothed, goofy-grinned icon of MAD magazine, the humor and satire comics magazine founded by William M. Gaines in 1952.
    We were early for band call and, except for a gap-toothed, long-haired hippie groping along in the opposite direction, seemed to be alone.


    gap-toothed = having widely spaced teeth


    Thank you for your efforts.


    Regards,


    V

  1. Tullia's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Aug 2010
    • Posts: 628
    #2

    Re: gap-toothed

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,


    Would you tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences?

    gap-toothed = having widely spaced teeth

    Yes. The technical term is "diastema (pl: diastemata)".

    It can refer to gaps between any teeth but most commonly (with humans) to a gap between the upper incisors (two front teeth).

    The expression can be traced back as far as Chaucer in English - he used it to refer to the Wife of Bath if I remember correctly. The folk belief of the time was that a gap-toothed woman was especially lustful.

    I believe nowadays some cultures, especially African ones, consider it a mark of beauty.

    However, it was popularised as an insult in American teen culture via the movie "Mean Girls" although it was used before then - teenagers do like to pick up on anything 'different', after all! I would be very wary before commenting on someone as "gap-toothed" nowadays as you can't be sure how it will be taken.

    As a reasonably related and possibly interesting comment, the French have a delightful phrase they use instead: dents du bonheur (Lucky teeth). Much more postitive-sounding!

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] Help me to fill two gap!
    By rachel03 in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 31-May-2009, 13:10
  2. gap-filling
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-Dec-2007, 13:36
  3. Fill in the gap
    By micaelo in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-Dec-2007, 02:15
  4. Gap year
    By Ali1984 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 17-Oct-2007, 23:41
  5. To bridge the gap of...
    By behnaazzz_f63 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 13-Nov-2006, 22:20

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •