Poll: Which is correct?

Be advised that this is a public poll: other users can see the choice(s) you selected.

Page 4 of 5 First 1 2 3 4 5 Last
Results 31 to 40 of 41

Thread: Apostrophes

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,569

    Re: Apostrophes

    a ten-year term
    or
    ten years' term

    In the sentence in question it's not the apostrophe but the word 'jail' used as a 'time-measurable event' that confuses me.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    2

    Re: Apostrophes

    I agree Mate.

  3. #33
    Huda-M's Avatar
    Huda-M is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Urdu
      • Home Country:
      • Pakistan
      • Current Location:
      • Pakistan
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,209

    Re: Apostrophes

    yeah, i was right, first sentence is correct!!! Apostrophe cant be used in this sentence.

  4. #34
    BookAddict is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Slovak
      • Home Country:
      • Slovak Republic
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    24

    Re: Apostrophes

    I'd say the second is good
    The use of GENITIVE
    - people: John's book
    - temporal expression: a week's holiday
    - distance: a mile's distance
    - figure of speech, small animals: at a snail's pace

  5. #35
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    27,915

    Re: Apostrophes

    35 posts, and the discussion continues. Posts #2 and 3 sum it up for me.

  6. #36
    06Pavithra is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Tamil
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    1

    Re: Apostrophes

    I feel the term ten years is most appropriate than ten years ' for the very reason that the time span is clearly mentioned towards the purpose --( IE) serving sentence in the jail

  7. #37
    Tan Elaine is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,367

    Re: Apostrophes

    I would write: The crime can be punished by up to ten years in jail.

  8. #38
    Tdol is online now Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    72,642

    Re: Apostrophes

    That's cheating a bit. Try using one year and see if you'd add 's.

  9. #39
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    Charlie Bernstein is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,436

    Re: Apostrophes

    Neither makes sense:

    - Ten years jail: What kind of jail is a ten years jail?

    - Ten years' jail: How can a jail belong to ten years?

    It should be "ten years IN jail." Maybe this is just another difference between British and American English.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  10. #40
    Tarheel's Avatar
    Tarheel is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    22,199

    Re: Apostrophes

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    Neither makes sense:

    - Ten years jail: What kind of jail is a ten years jail?

    - Ten years' jail: How can a jail belong to ten years?

    It should be "ten years IN jail." Maybe this is just another difference between British and American English.
    Yes, it is.

Page 4 of 5 First 1 2 3 4 5 Last

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •