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    #1

    premiered or premiere

    "The next episode of " Star Wars" will be premiered in the movietheaters around you" ( correct or incorrect?)

    OR


    " The movietheater, I live close to, will premiere the next episode of "Star Wars" on August 6th''(correct or incorrect)

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    #2

    Re: premiered or premiere

    Change movie theater/s to two words and remove the commas, and they are correct.

    Rover

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    #3

    Re: premiered or premiere

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Change movie theater/s to two words and remove the commas, and they are correct.

    Rover
    Is it possible to say:

    Instead of premiere " The next episode of "Star Wars" is coming soon to the movie theaters around you" Or perhaps it's better to say '" The next episode will soon come the movie theaters around you"

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: premiered or premiere

    A common expression used in the trailers (the ads that are supposed to get you excited about a movie by showing you clips from it) is "Coming soon to a theater near you."

    Coming soon to a theater near you: The next episode of the epic Star Wars saga
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: premiered or premiere

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    A common expression used in the trailers (the ads that are supposed to get you excited about a movie by showing you clips from it) is "Coming soon to a theater near you."

    Coming soon to a theater near you: The next episode of the epic Star Wars saga
    So it would sound weird/incorrect, if I said the two sentences given above?

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    #6

    Re: premiered or premiere

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    Is it possible to say:

    Instead of premiere " The next episode of "Star Wars" is coming soon to the movie theaters around you" Or perhaps it's better to say '" The next episode will soon come to the movie theaters around you"
    Certainly - either will do.

    'Premiere' refers specifically to the first screening of the film.

    Rover

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    #7

    Re: premiered or premiere

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Certainly - either will do.

    'Premiere' refers specifically to the first screening of the film.

    Rover
    Than you for your profound remarks!

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: premiered or premiere

    It may not sound weird -- it just depends on your context.

    Note that "a theater near you" is so commonly heard that other combinations (like "the theaters around you") do sound unusual, but not incorrect.

    However, since not all theaters show all the same films, "a theater" is more likely factually accurate than "the theaters" since it may not be playing in one of the ones near me.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #9

    Re: premiered or premiere

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    It may not sound weird -- it just depends on your context.

    Note that "a theater near you" is so commonly heard that other combinations (like "the theaters around you") do sound unusual, but not incorrect.

    However, since not all theaters show all the same films, "a theater" is more likely factually accurate than "the theaters" since it may not be playing in one of the ones near me.
    Could you give me an example of the context in which it will sound OK?

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    #10

    Re: premiered or premiere

    Peter, I'm so excited. I just saw the new episode of the Star Wars movie, and it was great! It was a sneak preview for contest winners -- technically, it hasn't officially opened yet. You're going to love it! But don't worry, you'll get to see it soon. It will be coming soon in the theater around you -- probably all of them, because it's going to be such a blockbuster! I can't wait to hear what you thought of it.
    Last edited by Barb_D; 17-Sep-2010 at 14:14.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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