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    #1

    "being" vs "to be"

    What is the difference between "being" and "to be"?

    When to use them?

    For example:

    1. He loves to be dramatic.
    2. He just loves being dramatic.

    Are both sentences correct?
    Last edited by RobertT; 19-Sep-2010 at 13:17.

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    #2

    Re: "being" vs "to be"

    /A learner/

    #1 He loves to appear in a dramatic way if a particular event happened.
    #2 He loves to be seen by the others as a dramatic person.

    This is what I think.

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    #3

    Re: "being" vs "to be"

    Both sound perfectly acceptable to me. I see no difference in meaning.

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    #4

    Re: "being" vs "to be"

    ----- Not an ESL teacher -----

    Quote Originally Posted by RobertT View Post
    What is the difference between "being" and "to be"?

    When to use them?

    For example:

    1. He loves to be dramatic.
    2. He just loves being dramatic.

    Are both sentences correct?
    Both sentences are correct and seem to mean the same.

    However, when I read e2e4's post (although I prefer c2c4), I figure there may be a slight and subtle difference. In #2 (apart from the word "just") you stress the fact that he loves the very act of being dramatic; I mean the emphasis relies on the verb "to be." But this may be just an impression.

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