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  1. Ferdie11's Avatar
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    #1

    I'm like

    Hello,

    Is the phrase "I'm like" used correctly in the sentence below?


    He started shouting at me and I'm like, "What's your problem? I'm on your side!"


    Many thanks.




    Source: Definition of like adverb (FEELINGS/SPEECH) from Cambridge Dictionary Online: Free English Dictionary and Thesaurus

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    #2

    Re: I'm like

    It is colloquial "street talk".

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: I'm like

    Much as I hate to admit it, I find myself using this more often than I would wish!

    If I can find it, I'll post a link to the video of the god that is Stephen Fry on Room 101 having a fantastic rant about the use of this very phrase!

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    #4

    Re: I'm like

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Much as I hate to admit it, I find myself using this more often than I would wish!

    If I can find it, I'll post a link to the video of the god that is Stephen Fry on Room 101 having a fantastic rant about the use of this very phrase!
    Please do it emsr2d2. We are eager to watch it.

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    #5

    Re: I'm like

    If we changed the original sentence to

    He started shouting at me and the like ...

    would the meaning be the same?

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: I'm like

    Quote Originally Posted by Abstract Idea View Post
    If we changed the original sentence to

    He started shouting at me and the like ...

    would the meaning be the same?
    No, not at all. With that sentence, it would mean he either started "shouting and the like" (he did other things similar to shouting) or he started shouting at "me and the like" (other people similar to me, although that's not good English).

    The "I'm like ..." in the original sentence means "I said" or "I said something like".

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: I'm like

    No, that would be a COMPLETELY different meaning.

    I use this too, but not when I'm talking to the CEO of my company. In fact, when I use this with my daughters (whom I often chide about using "like") they say "and you're LIKE what? You're LIKE that?" to point out that I'm using it that way.

    "And I'm like, '...'" means "and my reaction was to say..." or "and my reaction was to feel..."

    Even if you do not SAY the words that follow, that is how you feel and the meaning you want to convey.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: I'm like

    I finally tracked down the video. If you go to 1 minute 30 seconds, and watch the next 30 seconds, you'll see Stephen Fry giving a great example of how "like" is used in a very irritating way:

    YouTube - Stephen Fry on Room 101 - 3/3

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