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    #1

    "recommend him to" or "recommend he"?

    Dear teacher:
    what is right and what is wrong in these two sentences?

    The doctor did not recommend (for) him to eat (he eats) tomatoes.

    He said that the doctor did not recommend (had not recommended) him to eat (?) tomatoes.

    Thank you.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "recommend him to" or "recommend he"?

    There is a problem with negatives in situations like this.

    Did the doctor say "You should eat green beans, broccoli, kale, beets, squash, and mangoes" and simply not include tomatoes?

    What about tomatoes?
    The doctor didn't recommend that he eat tomatoes. I guess they don't have the same good properties of the other things on the list.


    Or, did the doctor say "I recommend you stay away from tomatoes. Their acidity will cause you problems."

    The doctor recommended he not eat tomatoes.
    Last edited by Barb_D; 23-Sep-2010 at 03:07.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.


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    #3

    Re: "recommend him to" or "recommend he"?

    Quote Originally Posted by sbrodsky View Post
    Dear teacher:
    what is right and what is wrong in these two sentences?

    The doctor did not recommend (for) him to eat (he eats) tomatoes.

    He said that the doctor did not recommend (had not recommended) him to eat (?) tomatoes.

    Thank you.
    Neither is correct.

    The pattern is:

    recommend(ed) him doing
    recommend(ed) he do (not 'does', always 'do', regardless of tenses)

    recommend(ed) him not doing
    recommend(ed) he not do (always 'not do', regardless of tenses)

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    #4

    Re: "recommend him to" or "recommend he"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    There is a problem with negatives in situations like this.

    Did the doctor say "You should eat green beans, broccoli, kale, beets, squash, and mangoes" and simply not include broccoli?

    What about tomatoes?
    The doctor didn't recommend that he eat tomatoes. I guess they don't have the same good properties of the other things on the list.


    Or, did the doctor say "I recommend you stay away from tomatoes. Their acidity will cause you problems."

    The doctor recommended he not eat tomatoes.

    I mean stay away from tomatoes.

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    #5

    Re: "recommend him to" or "recommend he"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    There is a problem with negatives in situations like this.

    Did the doctor say "You should eat green beans, broccoli, kale, beets, squash, and mangoes" and simply not include broccoli?

    What about tomatoes?
    The doctor didn't recommend that he eat tomatoes. I guess they don't have the same good properties of the other things on the list.


    Or, did the doctor say "I recommend you stay away from tomatoes. Their acidity will cause you problems."

    The doctor recommended he not eat tomatoes.

    Thank you for your answer, Barb_D!
    I still have a couple of questions.

    1. If I mean "stay away from tomatoes", I have to say "The doctor recommended he not eat tomatoes".
    Could I say this: The doctor did not alow he eat tomatoes.
    Or "him to eat tomatoes"?

    2. What about reported speech?
    He said that the doctor had not recommended he eat tomamtoes.
    Is it correct?

    Thank you.

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    #6

    Re: "recommend him to" or "recommend he"?

    If the doctor said "You should probably stay away from tomatoes" then you need to say "The doctor recommended he not eat tomatoes."

    If the doctor said, "You must not eat tomatoes," then say "The doctor forbade him to eat tomatoes" or "He was forbidden by his doctor to eat tomatoes."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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