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    #1

    Work on vs work on

    " I've been working on this project for a long time.''

    OR

    " I've been working at this project for a long time."

    Difference between "work on" and "work at" ?

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    #2

    Re: Work on vs work on

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    " I've been working on this project for a long time.''

    OR

    " I've been working at this project for a long time."

    Difference between "work on" and "work at" ?
    Anyone? Please

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    #3

    Re: Work on vs work on

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    Anyone? Please
    on

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    #4

    Re: Work on vs work on

    Quote Originally Posted by e2e4 View Post
    on
    I looked it up in the dictionary and it suggest both possibilities "work on" and "work at".
    Which one is more common and natural?

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    #5

    Re: Work on vs work on

    /A learner/

    Normally one says the sentence using the preposition on but if one wants to emphasise that one has been working hard at it then one uses the preposition at.

    I've been working at this project for a long time."

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    #6

    Re: Work on vs work on

    Working "on" a project is more natural. "At" tends to imply a location. I might say "I am working at the construction site."

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    #7

    Re: Work on vs work on

    hi,

    please note I'm not a teacher nor a native speaker;
    see for yourself: BNC

    Cheers.

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    #8

    Re: Work on vs work on

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaskin View Post
    hi,

    please note I'm not a teacher nor a native speaker;
    see for yourself: BNC

    Cheers.
    Anyone else?

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    #9

    Re: Work on vs work on

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaskin View Post
    hi,

    please note I'm not a teacher nor a native speaker;
    see for yourself: BNC

    Cheers.
    Good answer, if perhaps a little terse!

    Click on that link ostap77; it does a comparative search of the two expressions in the BNC. You'll notice that the second column ('work at') usually has a collocation that gives a time, place or a way of working ('work at a pace', etc). By contrast 'work on' is usually about developing something. So a construction worker would work on an office block, and a clerk would work at the same block (after the building work was done).

    b

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    #10

    Re: Work on vs work on

    I tend to interpret these sentence as in my following explanations. I'd be happy if I get confirmations from the native-speakers.

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    " I've been working on this project for a long time.''
    I work on this project by myself and/or I'm the mastermind of the project.

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    " I've been working at this project for a long time."
    There is a project carried on by a team, and I'm a member of it, I participate in but don't head it.

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