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    • Join Date: Sep 2010
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    #1

    to get yourself a...

    Hi,

    I was wondering if the structure " to get yourself a..." can have both a negative meaning and a positive one.
    For instance, in the sentence " You've got yourself an ugly bruise" the meaning is negative. Can I also say " You've got yourself a nice pet"?

    Does this structure imply the idea that whatever the subject has acquired ( a bruise/ a pet) is of an accidental nature, that he actually had no intention of getting that bruise or that pet?

    Thank you in advance
    LW

  1. englishhobby's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • Russian
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      • Russian Federation
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    • Join Date: Jun 2009
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    #2

    Re: to get yourself a...

    I don't think your definition of the structure is correct, just vise versa, it implies that the person who got a pet had an intention of getting it. In the case with the bruise this meaning is used ironically (something like "You have "obtained" a bruise" (this post is just an opinion of a non-native speaker).

  2. riquecohen's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Aug 2010
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    #3

    Re: to get yourself a...

    Quote Originally Posted by Lost Wolf View Post
    Hi,

    I was wondering if the structure " to get yourself a..." can have both a negative meaning and a positive one.
    For instance, in the sentence " You've got yourself an ugly bruise" the meaning is negative. Can I also say " You've got yourself a nice pet"?

    Does this structure imply the idea that whatever the subject has acquired ( a bruise/ a pet) is of an accidental nature, that he actually had no intention of getting that bruise or that pet?

    Thank you in advance
    LW
    Whether or not he had the intention of acquiring the pet, the sentence is not negative, but congratulatory. You can also say, ironically, "You´ve got yourself a nice bruise" or "You´ve got yourself into a fine mess."
    (In AmE we generally use gotten as the past participle of get.)

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