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  1. Over the top's Avatar
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    #1

    The wedding over

    The wedding over, and the bride people gone, her father and herself were left to dine toghether.

    Why isn't it the wedding is over?
    Why isn't it the bride people went or the bride people have gone?
    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: The wedding over

    I have added the missing words (and corrected the English).

    The wedding (being) over, and the bride's people (having) gone, her father and she were left to dine together.

    It is sometimes permissible to omit the "--ing" words like this. (Sorry, I'm not a teacher so I don't know the terms. Are they participles or gerunds?)

  2. Over the top's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: The wedding over

    A part of the spelling mistake of together, the whole sentence was taken from a novel called Emma by Jane Auston.
    "The bride people" was written without a possessive s , also it was "her father and herself" not her father and she.
    Thanks

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: The wedding over

    Quote Originally Posted by Over the top View Post
    A part of the spelling mistake of together, the whole sentence was taken from a novel called Emma by Jane Austen.
    "The bride people" was written without a possessive s , also it was "her father and herself" not her father and she.
    Thanks
    This novel's about 200 years old. "Her father and herself" would not be right these days. "She and her father" is how to say it.

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    #5

    Re: The wedding over

    Quote Originally Posted by Over the top View Post
    A part of the spelling mistake of together, the whole sentence was taken from a novel ......
    Thanks
    1. In English we say "apart from" not "apart of". Do not split the word "apart". Its usage is quite different from that of "a part of something".

    2. It is inappropriate to end a statement with "Thanks". See my separate post on this subject.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: The wedding over

    Quote Originally Posted by Koronas View Post
    A part of the spelling mistake of together, the whole sentence was taken from a novel ......
    3. An ellipsis has three dots; four if you include a period.

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    #7

    Re: The wedding over

    In Br. English we don't type "periods". I typed six full stops to indicate "sentence continues".

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: The wedding over

    Quote Originally Posted by Koronas View Post
    In Br. English we don't type "periods". I typed six full stops to indicate "sentence continues".
    I know you did. I'm suggesting that the traditional (and I'd say correct) way to indicate "sentence continues" or "a bit left out" is with three full stops, or four full stops if it's at the end of a sentence.
    The three full stops (...) is a typographical equivalent of an ellipsis, which is not available on keyboards.

    Ellipsis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    #9

    Re: The wedding over

    On this occasion I agree with Raymott.

    Rover

  6. Raymott's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: The wedding over

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    On this occasion I agree with Raymott.

    Rover
    That sounds like it rarely happens!
    Anyhow I agree with most of what you write, especially this time.

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