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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
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      • China
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    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 196
    #1

    which

    Dear all,

    Why use "which is" not "which are" in the below sentence? and what is the "which" referring to?

    "Despite overall consistency in profitability measures, Strabag's margins are thin, which is typical for the industry, and could deteriorate if there are cost overruns or delays on major projects."

    Thank you

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
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      • England
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    #2

    Re: which

    "Despite overall consistency in profitability measures, Strabag's margins are thin, which (result/outcome/situation) is typical for the industry, and could deteriorate if there are cost overruns or delays on major projects."

    The word "result" or "outcome" is implied.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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      • Australia
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      • Australia

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    #3

    Re: which

    Another way of looking at it is that the "which" clause applies to the whole of the preceding clause - not just one word. In cases like that, "is" is always used.
    "I need to feed the dogs, which are waiting for their dinner." (refers to 'dogs')
    "I need to feed the dogs, which is annoying because I'm engrossed in this TV show." (refers to the whole main clause)

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