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    #1

    over yonder

    " Got a cold beer?"

    " Sure it's over yonder in the fridge."

    Is "over yonder" more regional?

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    #2

    Re: over yonder

    Yes.

    It's an old word which is only used these days in some regional dialects or for poetic/literary purposes.

    Rover

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    #3

    Re: over yonder

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Yes.

    It's an old word which is only used these days in some regional dialects or for poetic/literary purposes.

    Rover
    A co-worker of mine from Alabama says a lof "yonder things". Like '' there is a bird on yonder tree". Do you say that in England?

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    #4

    Re: over yonder

    Yes - in some regional dialects or for poetic/literary purposes.

    Rover

  1. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: over yonder

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    In the US it is heard mostly in the southern states. It is an older term brought to America by the early settlers from England.
    Most words in English were brought to America by settlers from England.

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: over yonder

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    That is true but I did not limit the importation to only the English. The east coast of the US was visited and occupied, at various times, by the French, Germans, Irish, Scots, Spanish, Dutch (witness New York City), as well as other peoples.
    Ah, but visitors seldom leave behind their vocabulary. Baggage, yes. Their heart, yes, in San Francisco. Or Heidelberg. But not their vocables. ;)

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    #7

    Re: over yonder

    Yonder from yond preposition and adverb = beyond from yon = that

    I think the Scots use yon and yonder more than the English.

    See yonder, lo, the Galaxy Which men clepeth the Milky Wey, For hit is whyt. [Chaucer, "House of Fame"] (That is not to say Chaucer wore a kilt!)

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: over yonder

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedroski View Post
    ...

    I think the Scots use yon and yonder more than the English.

    ...
    Don't quote me on this, but I believe some dialects (like some languages) have '2nd and 3rd person thereness' (like Sp all/) [this is true], so that [this is speculation] 'there' could mean 'near you' with 'yon' meaning 'far from both of us'.

    b

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