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    #1

    slew around/sideways

    "He was driving so fast that when he bumped into a car he bassically slewed it off the highway into the ditch."

    Is it Ok to use "slew" in such way?

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    #2

    Re: slew around/sideways

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    "He was driving so fast that when he bumped into a car he bassically slewed it off the highway into the ditch."

    Is it Ok to use "slew" in such way?
    What do you think about this one?

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: slew around/sideways

    It doesn't sound natural to me.

    Also, you have a problem with "bumped." A bump is very gentle. A car going quickly won't "bump" something, but will crash, smash, or even plow into.

    Finally- basically, only one S.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #4

    Re: slew around/sideways

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    "He was driving so fast that when he bumped into a car he bassically slewed it off the highway into the ditch."

    Is it Ok to use "slew" in such way?
    "Slew" in the sense of the past tense of "slue" (to turn on an axis or rotate) is not common. I had to look it up.

    You probably want to say he caused the other car to spin. That would be commonly understood.

    slue - definition of slue by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: slew around/sideways

    If you said "[The way he hit it] slew it around into oncoming traffic" what would create a visual, but if the car just went off the road into a ditch, that's not slewing.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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