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    #1

    kin

    How about "kin" ?Is it widely used? Kin plural or singular?

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: kin

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    How about "kin" ?Is it widely used? Kin plural or singular?
    It's not widely used, at least not in BrE. It can be plural or singular, "My sister is the only kin I have", "My brothers and sisters are the only kin I have".

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    #3

    Re: kin

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    It's not widely used, at least not in BrE. It can be plural or singular, "My sister is the only kin I have", "My brothers and sisters are the only kin I have".
    I've looked it up in both Merriam-Webster and Longman. M-B says kinsfolk,whereas Longman suggests kinfolk without "s". Any difference?

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: kin

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    I've looked it up in both Merriam-Webster and Longman. M-B says kinsfolk,whereas Longman suggests kinfolk without "s". Any difference?
    Both "kinfolk" and "kinsfolk" are AmE so you'd need an American response.

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    #5

    Re: kin

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Both "kinfolk" and "kinsfolk" are AmE so you'd need an American response.
    I would kindly ask for an American response.

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    #6

    Re: kin

    It certainly defies logic, doesn't it?

    I have Southern roots, so I say "kin" without the folk, e.g., I had kin in New Orleans when Katrina hit, but thankfully they got out before it got bad. (Oddly, I use it for my Southern relatives, but I'd say "relatives" for the ones in New England.)

    However, I would stay "kinfolk" without the S, yet kinsman, with the S. I'm far more likely to say "kin" than either of these though.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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