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    #1

    As is one of the trickiest words in English

    China feels increasingly under siege as it becomes an international economic power, as others try to contain it,” Mr. Jiang said. “They don’t want to appear to be weak, because domestic pressure is mounting.” ---taken from the NYT
    Dear all,

    Usually I think of as as one of the most trickiest words in English.

    So when I ran into the above, I started a thread on another forum trying to know what the red as means here. After getting help from a trusty native speaker who asserted that this as clause is a adverbial time clause and as indicates an infinitve time, a non-native responded an interesting post saying: I consider the part after a comma as the explanation of the first 2 statements. I mean ... If others didn't try to contain it, there would have been no reason for China to feel under siege during the process of becoming an international economic power.


    I am confused a little bit and think either explanation is plausible. Now could you please tell me whether the latter opinion is probably correct? Thanks.


    LQZ

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: As is one of the trickiest words in English

    Quote Originally Posted by LQZ View Post
    Dear all,

    Usually I think of as as one of the most trickiest words in English.

    So when I ran into the above, I started a thread on another forum trying to know what the red as means here. After getting help from a trusty native speaker who asserted that this as clause is a adverbial time clause and as indicates an infinitve time [I've no idea what this is.] , a non-native responded an interesting post saying: I consider the part after a comma as the explanation of the first 2 statements. I mean ... If others didn't try to contain it, there would have been no reason for China to feel under siege during the process of becoming an international economic power.


    I am confused a little bit and think either explanation is plausible. Now could you please tell me whether the latter opinion is probably correct? Thanks.


    LQZ
    Whatever it means, it's badly written - in a way that suggests to me that the author isn't sure what s/he means - or, perhaps, s/he hasn't taken the time (under deadline pressure) to work out how to express it clearly. I agree with the NNS, but I wish journalists wouldn't pepper their work with 'as', as though it were some kind of meaningless condiment that serves only to spice up their prose.

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 27-Sep-2010 at 17:25. Reason: Clarified 1st sent.

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    #3

    Re: As is one of the trickiest words in English

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Whatever it means, it's badly written - in a way that suggests to me that the author isn't sure what s/he means - or, perhaps, s/he hasn't taken the time (under deadline pressure) to work out how to express it clearly. I agree with the NNS, but I wish journalists wouldn't pepper their work with 'as', as though it were some kind of meaningless condiment that serves only to spice up their prose.

    b
    Thank you for your response.

    But sorry for misleading you. I reviewed my aforementioned thread where the native said: These clauses beginning with "as" are adverbial time clauses. They serve to coordinate one event with another over a length of time. Did I make it clearer this time?

    And could you please tell me what is the NNS? I have no idea at all.

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    #4

    Re: As is one of the trickiest words in English

    I figure that NNS is the abbreviation for non-native speaker. Am I right?

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: As is one of the trickiest words in English

    Quote Originally Posted by LQZ View Post
    Thank you for your response.

    But sorry for misleading you. I reviewed my aforementioned thread where the native said: These clauses beginning with "as" are adverbial time clauses. They serve to coordinate one event with another over a length of time. Did I make it clearer this time?

    And could you please tell me what is the NNS? I have no idea at all.
    NNS = non-native speaker

    b

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