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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Use of the word "inveigles"

    Please advise if the word 'inveigles' is used correctly in the following sentence:

    The lack of response both in respect of a reply/acknowledgement, inveigles the question as to the success of this Unit in ensuring that policies and procedures are adhered to.

    Thank you

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    #2

    Re: Use of the word "inveigles"

    Change 'inveigles the question as to' to 'casts doubt upon'.

    Rover

  2. jerry081958's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Use of the word "inveigles"

    Quote Originally Posted by ramlal View Post
    Please advise if the word 'inveigles' is used correctly in the following sentence:

    The lack of response both in respect of a reply/acknowledgement, inveigles the question as to the success of this Unit in ensuring that policies and procedures are adhered to.

    Thank you
    I have a pretty good vocabulary, but this word was a new one today. To me, I think the writer meant to say 'begs the question"

    This sentence could be simplified:

    The unit has not replied or even acknowledged the messages. It really begs the question as to whether this unit will adhere to company policies and procedures at all.

  3. Munch's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Use of the word "inveigles"

    Quote Originally Posted by jerry081958 View Post
    I have a pretty good vocabulary, but this word was a new one today. To me, I think the writer meant to say 'begs the question"

    This sentence could be simplified:

    The unit has not replied or even acknowledged the messages. It really begs the question as to whether this unit will adhere to company policies and procedures at all.
    Just be a little careful with the phrase "begs the question". Although it is now commonly used to mean "leads one to ask", some people get uptight about it straying from its original meaning in logic, which is "to assume the conclusion you are trying to prove."

    I am not saying there is any problem with your suggestion, just making sure ramlal is aware of this issue.

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    #5

    Re: Use of the word "inveigles"

    Quote Originally Posted by Munch View Post
    Just be a little careful with the phrase "begs the question". Although it is now commonly used to mean "leads one to ask", some people get uptight about it straying from its original meaning in logic, which is "to assume the conclusion you are trying to prove."
    They do, but the common meaning is so widespread and ingrained that I feel that outside the realms of logic, they are trying to shut the stable door decades after the horse bolted and they should just accept that people use it to mean that. There are a number of cases where idioms and expressions end up meaning something very different from or even the opposite of the original meaning. And this is surely one of them.

  4. Munch's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Use of the word "inveigles"

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    They do, but the common meaning is so widespread and ingrained that I feel that outside the realms of logic, they are trying to shut the stable door decades after the horse bolted and they should just accept that people use it to mean that. There are a number of cases where idioms and expressions end up meaning something very different from or even the opposite of the original meaning. And this is surely one of them.
    I completely agree. Even my philosophy lecturer had no problem saying it had one meaning in everyday language and another specific academic meaning. There are some strict prescriptivists lurking here and there however, so one must be wary of pedantic ambushes!

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