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    • Join Date: May 2009
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    #1

    Smile HELP

    I understand that "help" is a bare infinitive so we have --- Let me help you design the house.

    But sometimes I found people write "Please help me to do....."

    What is the criteria in governing the use of "HELP" as a bare infinitive and to-infinitive?

  1. kenkk2's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2010
    • Posts: 69
    #2

    Re: HELP

    Quote Originally Posted by catoidtang View Post
    I understand that "help" is a bare infinitive so we have --- Let me help you design the house.

    But sometimes I found people write "Please help me to do....."

    What is the criteria in governing the use of "HELP" as a bare infinitive and to-infinitive?
    We may use a bare infinitive or a to-infinitive after a few verbs like help and know. The use of a " to-infinitive" is more formal.
    " Mother, help me( to) do this homework. "
    We do not usually omit "to" after "not" :
    " How can I help my children not to worry about their exams?"
    Help can be used without a Noun or a pronoun object :
    " Everyone in the village helped(to) build the new church".
    Or with a Noun or pronoun object :
    " Can anyone help me(to) fill in this fax form?"
    In the passive, "to" is obligatory after help:
    I was helped to overcome my fear of flying".
    Help+Passive infinitive is possible, though rare:
    " I am sure this treament will help him(to) be cured".

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: HELP

    Help can take either one.

    Learning English | BBC World Service

    I favor the "non-to" version, but it's simply a preference, neither more nor less correct than with the "to."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. kenkk2's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2010
    • Posts: 69
    #4

    Re: HELP

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Help can take either one.

    Learning English | BBC World Service

    I favor the "non-to" version, but it's simply a preference, neither more nor less correct than with the "to."
    Was I wrong when stating previously :" We MAY use a bare infinitive or a to-infinitive "?

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: HELP

    No, we posted moments apart. I'm not contradicting you at all - I was typing while when your post appeared.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. kenkk2's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2010
    • Posts: 69
    #6

    Re: HELP

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    No, we posted moments apart. I'm not contradicting you at all - I was typing while when your post appeared.
    I understand now, sorry for saying that, Barb_D!(I thought mine was ignored or re-corrected, I just wanted to learn more.)

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