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    #1

    get out of the train vs get off

    I suppose we don't get out of the train we get off the train?

  1. Munch's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: get out of the train vs get off

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    I suppose we don't get out of the train we get off the train?
    Yes, "get off the train" is the correct idiom. We also "get off the bus" and "get off of the boat" and "get off the motorbike".

    But, we "get out of the car".

    If you said "I got out of the train", personally I might imagine you climbing out the top of the train, or escaping from a train that had crashed.

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    #3

    Re: get out of the train vs get off

    Quote Originally Posted by Munch View Post
    Yes, "get off the train" is the correct idiom. We also "get off the bus" and "get off of the boat" and "get off the motorbike".

    But, we "get out of the car".

    If you said "I got out of the train", personally I might imagine you climbing out the top of the train, or escaping from a train that had crashed.
    There has been a so called "clash" between me and my friend over this issue.

    He insisted on "get out",whereas I insisted on "get off". I win!

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    #4

    Re: get out of the train vs get off

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    There has been a so called "clash" between me and my friend over this issue.

    He insisted on "get out",whereas I insisted on "get off". I win!
    Yes, as Munch said "get off the train" is correct. You can also say "get down from the train", although, this is perhaps less used these days.

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    #5

    Re: get out of the train vs get off

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Yes, as Munch said "get off the train" is correct. You can also say "get down from the train", although, this is perhaps less used these days.
    I appreciate it

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    #6

    Re: get out of the train vs get off

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    I suppose we don't get out of the train we get off the train?
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    (1) I believe that there are three other "big" words that mean

    "to get off the train":

    (a) We alighted from the train in Paris.

    (b) We detrained in Paris.

    (c) We disembarked (from) the train in Paris.

    (2) Nowadays, few (very few!!!) Americans would ever speak

    like this. If you used these terms, probably many people would

    think you were strange, or they might even laugh. Perhaps (b)

    and (c) are used only in official announcements. I think that

    (a) is really "old-fashioned." And nobody wants to be called

    "old-fashioned"!!!

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    #7

    Re: get out of the train vs get off

    "Alight" and "disembark" are still commonly used in formal speech and writing, especially by train companies. So you might hear those words at the train station, over the PA.

    "Detrain" I have never heard, but google tells me it is a real word. Perhaps it is American English.

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    #8

    Re: get out of the train vs get off

    /A learner/

    Quote Originally Posted by Munch View Post
    "Alight" and "disembark" are still commonly used in formal speech and writing, especially by train companies. So you might hear those words at the train station, over the PA.

    "Detrain" I have never heard, but google tells me it is a real word. Perhaps it is American English. I believe it must be Google English (Googlish)
    To alight ~ To get out of

    So 'alight' can not be used in case of the passenger's regular leaving a train or a bus. (In case of emergency only) (Already said)

    "To detrain"

    To disembark" I think it is not as same as to get on and off a buss a few times on the route to some place.

    Regarding Google, when I see how the software translate English into my mother tongue..
    The software doesn't know that cannot translate a sentence by way of translating it word by word.
    On the other hand it's better to have something than nothing.
    Last edited by e2e4; 08-Oct-2010 at 23:12.

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    #9

    Re: get out of the train vs get off

    To alight ~ To get out of

    So 'alight' can not be used in case of the passenger's regular leaving a train or a bus. (In case of emergency only) (Already said)
    Just to be clear, "alight" just means "get off", it is not only used in case of emergency.

    To disembark" I think it is not as same as to get on and off a bus a few times on the route to some place.
    Not sure what you mean here.

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    #10

    Re: get out of the train vs get off

    /A learner/

    From my trusted dictionary

    alight verb ( GET OUT OF )


    /əˈlaɪt/ v (alighted or old-fashioned alit, alighted or old-fashioned alit) old-fashioned

    [I] formal to get out of a vehicle, especially a train or busThe suspect alighted from the train at Euston and proceeded to Heathrow.

    Regarding to this "alight" doesn't mean "get off" but "get out of"

    Disembarkation ~ to leave mostly a ship (or an aircraft) especially after a long journey.(from another also trusted English to Explained-in-English dictionary)


    In my language


    to get off the buss ~ izaći iz autobusa

    to disembark (from a ship) ~ iskrcati se

    I see a slight difference between to get off and to disembark.

    to get off ~ one single step is needed to get off
    to disembark ~ one single step is not enough for disembarkation of someone or something from a vehicle (ship)

    Last edited by e2e4; 09-Oct-2010 at 09:47.

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