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    #1

    Cool GET

    Hello!

    Can we say:

    -to get down from a bus

    -to get off a bus

    -"Get your hands off of me!"

    Thank you
    W

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    #2

    Cool Re: GET

    What's wrong with my post?

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: GET

    Quote Originally Posted by Will17 View Post
    Hello!

    Can we say:

    -to get down from a bus

    -to get off a bus

    -"Get your hands off of me!"

    Thank you
    W
    Yes, you can say all of those.

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    #4

    Cool Re: GET

    Thank you!

    An d can we "Get your hands off me!"?

    THank you
    W

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: GET

    Quote Originally Posted by Will17 View Post
    Thank you!

    An d can we "Get your hands off me!"?

    THank you
    W
    Yes, you can say that.

  3. apbl's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: GET

    To my mind "Get your hands off of me", although heard a lot is not generally considered to be particularly good English in that the second proposition is superfluous to the meaning.

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    #7

    Re: GET

    "Get your hands off of me" off = adverb of = preposition. I think people in SE England tend to say 'off of' more than elsewhere, Others just use off.

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