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    #1

    like "being" / "to be" a girl

    Isabelle said, "I'm a girl, and I like being a girl."
    Isabelle said, "I'm a girl, and I like to be a girl."
    Are both good?


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    #2

    Re: like "being" / "to be" a girl

    Quote Originally Posted by AmerikaMagyar View Post
    Are both good?
    Not a teacher.

    "to be" implies change eg:

    "I am a boy, but I would like to be a man"

    "I'm a girl, and I like being a girl." Is the correct one.

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    #3

    Re: like "being" / "to be" a girl

    1) Isabelle said, "I'm a girl, and I like being a girl."
    2) Isabelle said, "I'm a girl, and I like to be a girl."

    I don't think 2) is wrong. Why do you say only 1) is correct? There is the famous: 'to be or not to be'. Is there a change implicit in 'to be' there?

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: like "being" / "to be" a girl

    Quote Originally Posted by AmerikaMagyar View Post
    Are both good?
    The second doesn't sound natural to me.

    Note: If you put part of your post in a quote box, it won't show up when someone quotes you.


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    #5

    Re: like "being" / "to be" a girl

    Not a teacher.


    "to be or not to be". Although when he wrote this I’m sure Shakespeare’s intent was simply to ask wether or not one should "be", I am going to have to add to the sentence in order to explain myself.

    "To be a girl or not to be a girl?"

    Again the "to be" is asking a question of change, not emphasizing the state of being a girl, the reader has no idea if the subject is a girl or not at the moment.


    "Being a girl or not being a girl"

    The subject is clearly a girl and the state of being one is in question here. This is the message trying to be portrayed.
    Last edited by jeckel; 09-Oct-2010 at 14:25. Reason: Added: Not a teacher

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: like "being" / "to be" a girl

    Quote Originally Posted by AmerikaMagyar View Post
    Are both good?
    The second is not natural English.

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    #7

    Re: like "being" / "to be" a girl

    Can't get the hang of them there quotes!

    Shakesbeer didn't write: 'being or not being, this is the question'.

    'be' can mean become. "To be a girl or not to be a girl?" he/she asked him/herself, standing in front of the sex-change clinic.

    Dunno what subject you mean in "Being a girl or not being a girl" 'a girl' is female, except of course in Bankok and Amsterdam, where they may have either sex and still be gorgeous, but does a phrase have a subject??.

    "Being a girl or not being a girl," is irrelevant he/she said.

    As to natural English: I had a guy from Alabama staying with me recently. His English is very different to mine, but quite natural and understandable. Where do you put your measuring stick? When does English become unnatural?

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    #8

    Re: like "being" / "to be" a girl

    Wrong topic sorry.

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    #9

    Re: like "being" / "to be" a girl

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedroski View Post

    As to natural English: I had a guy from Alabama staying with me recently. His English is very different to mine, but quite natural and understandable. Where do you put your measuring stick? When does English become unnatural?
    OK, it's not just unnatural, it's probably wrong. The sentences mean different things.
    1. "I like to be a girl" means "I like acting like a girl".
    2. "I like being a girl" can mean "I'm comfortable and happy in being a girl; I accept that I'm a girl and I like it". Or it could be used to mean 1.
    But 1. doesn't mean 2.

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    #10

    Re: like "being" / "to be" a girl

    Probably wrong? Are we talking Quantum Grammar here? Or just wrong in Brisbane? I still can't get the hang of quotes!!

    'be' means acting?? That is new for me. You could also read it as existential 'be', or 'be' = become.

    If someone asks an Englishwoman 'Do you like being a girl?' and she answers, 'Yes,I like to be girl' cf I like to be free' is she then unnatural?

    This is from a lesbian web page: Leena is a girl.

    Arizona, Tucson. 19

    I'm Leena. I usually don't give into using labels, but I guess I would be a femme bi that prefers women. I like to be a girl and go shopping and tanning and so on, but I also have a tomboy side since I have a lot of guy friends. I'm extremely loyal to the people I love and very romantic. I'm very …

    Do you still think 1) doesn't mean 2)? If so, why?

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