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    #1

    soldier different meanings

    Is "soldier" frequently used as a verb?

    1)"He had been soldiering for two years when the war in Vietnam broke out."

    OR

    2)"Stop soldiering. You are not in the Military."

    OR

    3)"It was almost impossible to acomplish, but he soldiered on to the end."

    OR

    4)"I can't put up with it. He has been soldiering all the time. I'll tell the boss on him."
    Last edited by ostap77; 10-Oct-2010 at 20:21.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: soldier different meanings

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    Is "soldier" frequently used as a verb?

    "He had been soldiering for two years when the war in Vietnam broke out." OK.

    OR

    "Stop soldiering. You are not in the Military." Not OK.

    OR

    "It was almost impossible to accomplish, but he soldiered on to the end." OK.

    OR

    "I can't put up with it. He has been soldiering all the time. I'll tell the boss on him." Not OK.
    .

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    #3

    Re: soldier different meanings

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    .
    I've looked up in a Merriam Webster's dictionary. So regarding the context in 2) and 4) it says "to behave in a soldierly maner" and "to make a pretense of working while really loafing." Did you ever hear say it?
    Last edited by ostap77; 11-Oct-2010 at 02:09.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: soldier different meanings

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    I've looked up in a Merriam Webster's dictionary. So regarding the context in 2) and 4) it says "to behave in a soldierly manner" and "to make a pretense of working while really loafing." Did you ever hear say it?
    No, I've never heard that.

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    #5

    Re: soldier different meanings

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    No, I've never heard that.
    Does it make sense to Americans?

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    #6

    Re: soldier different meanings

    No, it makes no sense to me.

    To add to the confusion, I've heard the expression "dead soldier" to refer to an empty bottle of liquor.

    A "trooper" is a cavalryman. Often "a good trooper" means in the USA "a hard worker, someone who is responsible, etc." It's an old expression, and I don't think you will find it often today.

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    #7

    Re: soldier different meanings

    Quote Originally Posted by DRThomas View Post
    No, it makes no sense to me.

    To add to the confusion, I've heard the expression "dead soldier" to refer to an empty bottle of liquor.

    A "trooper" is a cavalryman. Often "a good trooper" means in the USA "a hard worker, someone who is responsible, etc." It's an old expression, and I don't think you will find it often today.
    What about 4) meaning that one's been dodging his duties on the job?
    Taking about number 2) someone is being too strict and demanding as if in the military?

    Where do you think those guys on "the Merriam and Webster's dictionary" team got these defenitions from?
    Last edited by ostap77; 11-Oct-2010 at 02:11.

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    #8

    Re: soldier different meanings

    Soldiering on works for me -- keeps on working hard.

    2 and 4 don't. I don't know where some of these come from. My favorite example is "brunet" for a male brown-haired person. It's in the dictionary, but never in my life have I heard it. (Nonetheless, the poster insisted that because it was in the dictionary, it was fine to use, despite numerous native speakers saying that doing so would sound very strange to anyone who heard it.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #9

    Re: soldier different meanings

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Soldiering on works for me -- keeps on working hard.

    2 and 4 don't. I don't know where some of these come from. My favorite example is "brunet" for a male brown-haired person. It's in the dictionary, but never in my life have I heard it. (Nonetheless, the poster insisted that because it was in the dictionary, it was fine to use, despite numerous native speakers saying that doing so would sound very strange to anyone who heard it.)
    OK 2) and 4) out of my head. What verb would you use to say that someone's been dodging his duties on the job while pretending to be working hard?

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    #10

    Re: soldier different meanings

    Shirking
    Slacking
    I had forgotten about "goldbricking" but I had heard that one before
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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