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    #1

    Exclamation Rules!

    Hi teachers,

    I waited for a long time, but you did'nt come.

    I waited for a long time, but you never came.

    I think, both are correct. Cud u explain?
    Thanks a lot.

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    #2

    Re: Rules!

    ----- Not an ESL teacher -----

    Quote Originally Posted by bhagona View Post
    Hi teachers,

    I waited for a long time, but you did'nt come.

    I waited for a long time, but you never came.

    I think, both are correct. Cud u explain?
    Thanks a lot.
    Both are correct. In some contexts they may be interchangeable.

    Some context is needed but maybe you could spot the following difference:
    The first one could refer to a shorter period of time. For example, you waited for your date for about one or two hours, or perhaps all night long, and she didn't show up.
    On the other hand the second one could refer to a longer period of time. Let us say you waited for the girl of your dreams for several months or years and she never appeared.

    PS The only thing in your post that disturbs me is the "Cud u" part. That would really read better as "Could you".

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    #3

    Re: Rules!

    1) I waited for a long time, but you did'nt come.

    2) I waited for a long time, but you never came.

    I would call 2) slang. I would say it that way, but I think it is not quite correct. For it to be true, you would have to wait at least your whole life, or even longer, all of eternity. Then you could confidently say, 'You never came.'

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    #4

    Re: Rules!

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedroski View Post
    1) I waited for a long time, but you did'nt come.

    2) I waited for a long time, but you never came.

    I would call 2) slang. I would say it that way, but I think it is not quite correct. For it to be true, you would have to wait at least your whole life, or even longer, all of eternity. Then you could confidently say, 'You never came.'
    Thanks for your input Pedroski, it is always important to know an English native's opinion.

    But if I understand well your argument is based only on semantics, not on syntax, right?

    Even considering semantics, are you claiming the word "never" should be used only to refer to eternity (or at least one's whole life)?

    So that the readers know, Raymott has written something about this topic here:
    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a...tml#post662788

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    #5

    Re: Rules!

    Yes, the meaning of 'never' is why I think it is not a good way to express being stood up here. 'never' = 'not ever', an emphatic form of 'not'

    You never came to my house. (You have never been to my house)
    You never came to my house this year. (You haven't been to my house this year.) 'never' and 'this year' clash a bit.

    But as Raymott said, lots of people say it that way, me being a major culprit: 'I waited but she never showed.'

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    #6

    Re: Rules!

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedroski View Post
    You never came to my house. (You have never been to my house)
    You never came to my house this year. (You haven't been to my house this year.) 'never' and 'this year' clash a bit.
    I agree in your second example above 'never' and 'this year' clash a little bit, but only a tiny little bit.
    What if it were:
    "The year of 1981 was really terrible, too troublesome, do you remember?
    You never came to my house that year."
    I think with such context it looks fine. What do you think?

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