Results 1 to 4 of 4
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2009
    • Posts: 188
    #1

    Question Confusion about AS

    Dear teacher,

    I was taught in school that as could be read as a relative pronoun used to introduce a relative clause. Also many results returned on a dominant search Engine -Baidu- tell the same that may be deeply rooted in many Chinese learners' minds. For examples,

    1 As we all know, the earth is not flat.
    2 He did as I said.
    3 He passed the exam as expected.
    4 He is as tall as his father.
    (All these examples are created by me.)

    However, today I did a search on Google finding out "as" is excluded from common relative pronouns on some trusty learning-English Web sites. And some dictionaries also support as(s) of this kind are conjunctions, not pronouns.

    Now, to remove my confusion, could you please tell me whether you think of "as" as a relative pronoun? Thanks.


    LQZ

    Edit: Seems dictionaries have contrary views. The Webster dictionary gives as for a conjunction while Dictionary.com for a pronoun.
    Last edited by LQZ; 12-Oct-2010 at 07:14.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,937
    #2

    Re: Confusion about AS

    I see them as conjunctions, but you could make a case for number 2.

    (and should 4 be there?: Definition of as adverb from Cambridge Dictionary Online: Free English Dictionary and Thesaurus)

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #3

    Re: Confusion about AS

    Quote Originally Posted by LQZ View Post
    Dear teacher,

    I was taught in school that as could be read as a relative pronoun used to introduce a relative clause. Also many results returned on a dominant search Engine -Baidu- tell the same that may be deeply rooted in many Chinese learners' minds. For examples,

    1 As we all know, the earth is not flat.
    2 He did as I said.
    3 He passed the exam as expected.
    4 He is as tall as his father.
    (All these examples are created by me.)

    However, today I did a search on Google finding out "as" is excluded from common relative pronouns on some trusty learning-English Web sites. And some dictionaries also support as(s) of this kind are conjunctions, not pronouns.

    Now, to remove my confusion, could you please tell me whether you think of "as" as a relative pronoun? Thanks.


    LQZ

    Edit: Seems dictionaries have contrary views. The Webster dictionary gives as for a conjunction while Dictionary.com for a pronoun.


    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    (1) In 1931, Professor George O. Curme wrote a two-volume grammar

    entitled A Grammar of the English Language. He explains in detail the

    history of as as a relative pronoun. If you can find a copy in a good

    library, it would be well worth your effort.

    (2) Here are some examples from his book:

    He was an Englishman, as (or which) they perceived by his accent.

    You behave like a madman, as (or which) you are.

    Nor was the testimony ... less important, showing, as (in a parenthetical remark more common than which) it did, that the officers were not philanthropists.

    (3) I wish to summarize this post with the professor's opinion that:

    In the literary language relative as has never been widely used,

    but is well established in certain categories, especially after

    the same and such, also in descriptive clauses where the reference

    is to a preceding or following statement [like the three examples I

    cited above].

    P. S. He writes that "In popular speech [that is, the speech of the

    common people] as or what often replace that or who: 'They've a

    friend as (or what) will help 'em.' "

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 670
    #4

    Re: Confusion about AS

    Firstly: the Earth is flat (except for the bumps). Just look out the window!
    'as' is complicated. It is not always a relative pronoun. If you can replace it, in a given sentence, with a common relative pronoun, then it is there a relative pronoun. It can be a relative pronoun. It can be other things. It is not often clearly a relative pronoun. Just take ordinary sentences which have relative clauses, and try to substitiute 'as' for the relative pronoun. Common or garden relative pronouns are not always relative pronouns. 'Where are you going?' 'Which is that?

    In The Midlands in England you might hear, for example: My brother, as is a policeman, would not take kindly to that.

    1 As we all know, the earth is not flat. 'As we all know' an absolute clause, very similar to a non-defining relative clause. cf The Earth is not flat, that we all know, however, blablabla ...
    2 He did as I said. as a preposition, 'as I said' an adverbial pointed at 'did'
    3 He passed the exam as (was) expected (of him). as expected = in the way expected adverbial 'how did he pass?'
    4 He is as tall as his father. as 'adjective' as 'noun' he is 'in that way' tall 'in the way of' his father. 'as' compares here. I would call it a comparative adverb.

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] confusion
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-Apr-2009, 16:14
  2. [Grammar] Confusion
    By shraddha166 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 28-Aug-2008, 00:33
  3. confusion
    By waves in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-Mar-2008, 08:07
  4. Confusion
    By Vlad4 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-Feb-2007, 12:56
  5. confusion
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22-Jan-2007, 01:43

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •