Results 1 to 7 of 7
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Great Britain

    • Join Date: Mar 2010
    • Posts: 96
    #1

    position of this comma and why?

    I hope the weather is kind to you and your colleagues at the weekend, and the race goes to plan.


  1. apbl's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Italy

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 77
    #2

    Re: position of this comma and why?

    A comma before "and" is generally not necessary unless the "and" is embarking on a new topic in which case the comma can help to create a useful pause. Here the "and" is continuing with the same subject matter and so I would say that the comma is redundant and possibly even interrupts the flow of the sentence slightly.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,615
    #3

    Re: position of this comma and why?

    Quote Originally Posted by apbl View Post
    A comma before "and" is generally not necessary unless the "and" is embarking on a new topic in which case the comma can help to create a useful pause. Here the "and" is continuing with the same subject matter and so I would say that the comma is redundant and possibly even interrupts the flow of the sentence slightly.
    I agree, it makes an unnatural pause.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,310
    #4

    Re: position of this comma and why?

    Quote Originally Posted by apbl View Post
    A comma before "and" is generally not necessary unless the "and" is embarking on a new topic in which case the comma can help to create a useful pause. Here the "and" is continuing with the same subject matter and so I would say that the comma is redundant and possibly even interrupts the flow of the sentence slightly.
    I think the opposite. Since "you and your colleagues" is there, the next "and" is separated by a comma to indicate that it isn't part of the "you and your colleagues" conjunction.

  3. apbl's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Italy

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 77
    #5

    Re: position of this comma and why?

    I had considered that interpretation but came to the conclusion that "at the weekend" was sufficient to provide that break.

    In any case I don't think it's a real bone of contention.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,479
    #6

    Re: position of this comma and why?

    My guess is that the writer is transcribing something he wants to say and this is where he snatches a quick breath.

    Rover

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #7

    Re: position of this comma and why?

    Quote Originally Posted by boozl View Post
    I hope the weather is kind to you and your colleagues at the weekend, and the race goes to plan.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    (1) I think that the sentence is perfect with the comma.

    (2) Perhaps (perhaps!) the "rule" involved here is the old advice:

    Use a comma to prevent misunderstanding.

    (3) Without a comma, some fast reader might think that the writer

    were referring to "the weekend and the race."

    (4) Furthermore, could it not be justified by interpreting it as a

    compound sentence:

    I hope the weather is kind to you and your colleagues

    at [on] the weekend,

    and [I hope that] the race goes [according] to plan.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

Similar Threads

  1. About the position of 'comma'.
    By wotcha in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 15-Aug-2010, 10:05
  2. comma or not comma before and after 'such as'
    By duiter in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 25-May-2010, 17:12
  3. [General] permanent full time position/temporary full time position
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Apr-2009, 22:37
  4. [Grammar] position of 'really'
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-Jul-2008, 10:11
  5. the position of almost
    By enydia in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 13-May-2008, 01:27

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •