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    gerund

    how do i know if in a phrase goes a gerund or an infinitive? there are rules to know it.
    thank you i'll expect your answer

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by Arian View Post
    how do i know if in a phrase goes a gerund or an infinitive? there are rules to know it.
    thank you i'll expect your answer
    A gerund phrase will begin with a gerund, an ing word, and might include other modifiers and/or objects. Gerund phrases always function as nouns, so they will be subjects, subject complements, or objects in the sentence.

    Running across a busy street can be very dangerous for a young child.
    This gerund phrase (in bold) acts as the subject of the sentence.
    He was awarded a medal after winning the race.
    his gerund phrase(in bold) acts as the object of the preposition after.

    However, you can at times confuse between a Gerund and present participle phrases, because they both begin with an ing word. The difference is that a gerund phrase will always function as a noun while a present participle phrase describes another word in the sentence. Check out these examples:

    Bernard hates buttering toast with a fork.
    Buttering toast with a fork = gerund phrase, the direct object of the verb hates.
    Buttering toast with a fork, Bernard vowed that he would finally wash the week's worth of dirty dishes piled in the sink.
    Buttering toast with a fork = present participle phrase describing Bernard.

    Infinitive phrases begin with an infinitive and can function as nouns, adjectives, or adverbs. Look at these examples:

    She hopes to win the approval of her mother by switching her major from fine arts to pre-med.
    To win the approval of her mother functions as a noun because it is the direct object for the verb hopes.
    Let me show you the best way to paint the door. (adjective)
    The officer returned to help the inspectors. (adverb)

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