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    #1

    "I am ill for two days" OR "I have been ill for two days?"

    Hi,

    "I am ill for two days" OR "I have been ill for two days?"
    "He is absent for a week" OR "He has been absent for a week?"

    Many thanks

  1. apbl's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "I am ill for two days" OR "I have been ill for two days?"

    I have been ill for two days.
    He has been absent for a week.

    The action started in the past and continues in the present and therefore requires a present perfect tense.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "I am ill for two days" OR "I have been ill for two days?"

    - although in a context like this the present is possible: 'It's not fair. Smokers spend as much as an hour every day, hanging around the back door: in effect they're absent for a week every two months.'

    b

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    #4

    Re: "I am ill for two days" OR "I have been ill for two days?"

    And, following on from BobK's post, I can say: "Smoking is so revolting to me that if I so much as see a cigarette I am ill for two days"

  4. apbl's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "I am ill for two days" OR "I have been ill for two days?"

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    And, following on from BobK's post, I can say: "Smoking is so revolting to me that if I so much as see a cigarette I am ill for two days"
    Absolutely. The preposition for is doing different things in Bob's and in your example from what it does when combined with the present perfect. In your examples for is simply establishing the period of time in which an action takes place. It is only when you combine for with the use of the present perfect that you get the "starting in the past and continuing in the present" effect.

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