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    #1

    more mixed conditional

    1)"If I had this book, I would give it to you."

    OR

    2)"If I had this book, I would have given it to you."

    How about the second sentence? Can we say it meaning "If I had a book in general" and the second part refering to a poin in the past?

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    #2

    Re: more mixed conditional

    We would be most unlikely to say, "If I had this book, I would have given it to you" with the a meaning similar to: "In the not very likely event of my being the owner of this book, then there is a hyothetical possibility that I gave it to you." It's not so much the grammar as the near-impossibility of the situation that renders the utterance so unlikely.

    It's just about possible with a different meaning. Let's consider a series of utterances:

    1. If I have a book, I give it away.
    2. If I have a book, I will give it away.
    3. If I had a book, I gave it away.
    4. If I had a book I would give it away.
    5. If I had had a book, I would have given it away.
    6. I had a book. I will have given it away.
    7. I had a book I would have given it away.
    8. If I had a book I would have given it away.

    [1] is the traditional Zero Conditional, where if has a meaning similar to whenever.
    [2] could be EITHER (a) a traditional First Conditional, referring to a possible future event, OR (b) a Zero Conditional in which will indicates volition/customary habit rather than futurity. (Context and co-text will usually make it clear which is intended.
    [3] is the past-time Zero Conditional, where, once again, if has a meaning similar to whenever
    [4] could be EITHER (a) a traditional Second Conditional referring to a less likely future or present event, OR (b) a Zero Conditiona l(past time) in which would indicates volition/customary habit rather than futurity. (Context and co-text will usually make it clear which is intended.
    [5] is the traditional Third Conditional indicating a counterfactual hypothesis about the past.
    [6] is not a conditional. The speaker states that s/he did have a book (fact), and that s/he is certain that s/he gave it away (will denotes certainty).
    [7] is also not a conditional. It is similar to meaning to [6], except that would implies a more remote certainty than will.

    This brings us to [8].This is not a conditional in the accepted sense. It is similar to [7] in meaning, except that if is used with a meaning similar to granted/accepted that.

    My personal feeling is that [8] is a rare utterance. the meaning is more likely to be expressed with some such words as: "Well, assuming that I did have the book, then I probably gave it away. However, it's possible
    Last edited by 5jj; 14-Oct-2010 at 19:33.

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    #3

    Re: more mixed conditional

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    We would be most unlikely say, "If I had this book, I would have given it to you" with the a meaning similar to: "In the not very likely event of my being the owner of this book, then there is a hyothetical possibility that I gave it to you." It's not so much the grammar as the near-impossibility of the situation that renders the utterance so unlikely.

    It's just about possible with a different meaning. Let's consider a series of utterances:

    1. If I have a book, I give it away.
    2. If I have a book, I will give it away.
    3. If I had a book, I gave it away.
    4. If I had a book I would give it away.
    5. If I had had a book, I would have given it away.
    6. I had a book. I will have given it away.
    7. I had a book I would have given it away.
    8. If I had a book I would have given it away.

    [1] is the traditional Zero Conditional, where if has a meaning similar to whenever.
    [2] could be EITHER (a) a traditional First Conditional, referring to a possible future event, OR (b) a Zero Conditional in which will indicates volition/customary habit rather than futurity. (Context and co-text will usually make it clear which is intended.
    [3] is the past-time Zero Conditional, where, once again, if has a meaning similar to whenever
    [4] could be EITHER (a) a traditional Second Conditional referring to a less likely future or present event, OR (b) a Zero Conditiona l(past time) in which would indicates volition/customary habit rather than futurity. (Context and co-text will usually make it clear which is intended.
    [5] is the traditional Third Conditional indicating a counterfactual hypothesis about the past.
    [6] is not a conditional. The speaker states that s/he did have a book (fact), and that s/he is certain that s/he gave it away (will denotes certainty).
    [7] is also not a conditional. It is similar to meaning to [6], except that would implies a more remote certainty than will.

    This brings us to [8].This is not a conditional in the accepted sense. It is similar to [7] in meaning, except that if is used with a meaning similar to granted/accepted that.

    My personal feeling is that [8] is a rare utterance. the meaning is more likely to be expressed with some such words as: "Well, assuming that I did have the book, then I probably gave it away. However, it's possible
    I would like as many people comment on this one as can be.

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    #4

    Re: more mixed conditional

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    1)"If I had this book, I would give it to you."

    OR

    2)"If I had this book, I would have given it to you."

    How about the second sentence? Can we say it meaning "If I had a book in general" and the second part refering to a poin in the past?
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    (1) I think the answer to your question is YES.

    (2) Tom: May I borrow the new book about English now?

    You: Sorry. I do not have it. If I had the new book (I do not),

    I would, of course, give it to you (for you are my best friend).

    *****

    (3) Martha: I am very angry with you.

    You: Why?

    Martha: You did not give me that new book yesterday.

    You: I couldn't.

    Martha: Why not?

    You: Because I did not have the book yesterday. In fact, I still do not

    have that book. Naturally, if I had that book (I do not), I would have

    given it to you (for you are my second best friend).

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

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