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    #1

    bed

    Hi

    Please let me know which part of speech is bed over here.

    He goes to bed.

    Regards
    Pallavi

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    #2

    Re: bed

    Quote Originally Posted by pallavi kakkar View Post
    Hi

    Please let me know which part of speech is bed over here.

    He goes to bed.

    Regards
    Pallavi
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    He = pronoun.

    goes = verb.

    to= preposition.

    bed = noun. (The object of a preposition is always a noun or a pronoun.)

    to bed = prepositional phrase that modifies/ belongs to/ comes under

    "goes." Where does he go? To bed.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

  1. lauralie2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: bed

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    He = pronoun.

    goes = verb.

    to= preposition.

    bed = noun. (The object of a preposition is always a noun or a pronoun.)

    to bed = prepositional phrase that modifies/ belongs to/ comes under
    What if we replaced 'bed' with 'sleep', would that change things?

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    #4

    Re: bed

    Quote Originally Posted by lauralie2 View Post
    What if we replaced 'bed' with 'sleep', would that change things?
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Great question!!!

    (1) He = pronoun.

    (2) goes = verb.

    (3) to = preposition.

    (4) sleep = noun.

    to sleep = prepositional phrase. (He goes to sleep very quickly.)

    (5) to sleep = infinitive.

    Why are you going to the sofa now? I am going to the sofa in order

    to sleep.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

  2. lauralie2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: bed

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Great question!!!

    (1) He = pronoun.

    (2) goes = verb.

    (3) to = preposition.

    (4) sleep = noun.

    to sleep = prepositional phrase. (He goes to sleep very quickly.)

    (5) to sleep = infinitive.

    Why are you going to the sofa now? I am going to the sofa in order

    to sleep.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****
    Looking at (4), could 'sleep' be interpreted as a noun, a place, really? Or is it that 'to sleep', an infinitive in form, functions as a noun phrase?


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    #6

    Re: bed

    Quote Originally Posted by lauralie2 View Post
    Looking at (4), could 'sleep' be interpreted as a noun, a place, really? Or is it that 'to sleep', an infinitive in form, functions as a noun phrase?
    "To sleep" is an infinitive here as one may say
    "I went out to play"

  3. lauralie2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: bed

    Quote Originally Posted by shoaib 1 View Post
    "To sleep" is an infinitive here as one may say "I went out to play"
    Mmm, but the same cannot be said to work here:


    • ?He goes [in order] to sleep.

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    #8

    Re: bed

    Quote Originally Posted by lauralie2 View Post
    Mmm, but the same cannot be said to work here:


    • ?He goes [in order] to sleep.

    *****NOT A TEACHER *****

    (1) He went out (in order) to sleep (in the treehouse). Infinitive. "Good"

    English.

    (2) He goes [in order] to sleep. "Bad" English. (infinitive)

    (3) He goes to sleep. "Good" English. (noun)

    (a) "Sleep" = noun

    (i) a condition of body and mind such as that which typically

    occurs for several hours every night. (The New Oxford American Dictionary.)

    Tommy, turn off the TV now and go to sleep. (prepositional phrase) This

    "Tommy" sentence is only mine. It is NOT given in the dictionary cited.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

  4. lauralie2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: bed

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    (2) He goes [in order] to sleep. "Bad" English. (infinitive)

    (3) He goes to sleep. "Good" English. (noun)

    (a) "Sleep" = noun

    (i) a condition of body and mind such as that which typically occurs for several hours every night. (The New Oxford American Dictionary.)
    I see your point of view: 'sleep' is synonymous with 'bed', but the semantics are off. The definition, provided by Oxford, above, works well with, say, "Sleep is what we do at night, not in the day", but not with 'to sleep' in "He goes to sleep", as in that construct, 'sleep' refers to an act, not a place, and as such functions as part of an infinitive verb, which makes it verbal, not nominal:



    • He goes to bed at 10 p.m. <prepositional phrase>
    • He goes to sleep at 10 p.m. <infinitive phrase>


    Above, two similar structures introduced by the word 'to' admit different semantics. One refers to a place, a bed, whereas the other refers to an act, sleep. This difference, the one between place and act, manifests as follows:


    • to bed
      • form: prepositional phrase: to + noun
      • function: absolute noun phrase

    • to sleep
      • form: infinitive phrase: to + base verb
      • function: absolute noun phrase




    My point, 'sleep' is a verb, not a noun. It's the infinite 'to sleep' that functions as a noun.

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    #10

    Re: bed

    Quote Originally Posted by lauralie2 View Post
    I see your point of view: 'sleep' is synonymous with 'bed', but the semantics are off. The definition, provided by Oxford, above, works well with, say, "Sleep is what we do at night, not in the day", but not with 'to sleep' in "He goes to sleep", as in that construct, 'sleep' refers to an act, not a place, and as such functions as part of an infinitive verb, which makes it verbal, not nominal:



    • He goes to bed at 10 p.m. <prepositional phrase>
    • He goes to sleep at 10 p.m. <infinitive phrase>
    Above, two similar structures introduced by the word 'to' admit different semantics. One refers to a place, a bed, whereas the other refers to an act, sleep. This difference, the one between place and act, manifests as follows:


    • to bed
      • form: prepositional phrase: to + noun
      • function: absolute noun phrase
    • to sleep
      • form: infinitive phrase: to + base verb
      • function: absolute noun phrase
    My point, 'sleep' is a verb, not a noun. It's the infinite 'to sleep' that functions as a noun.
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    (1) Thank you for your most persuasive comments. Your posts show that

    you have a solid background in grammar. We all -- native speakers and

    learners -- always learn so much from your answers.

    (2) If I am not mistaken, I believe that even the experts at the

    university often disagree on how to interpret certain points of grammar.

    (3) I was not able to find out much about this topic on the Web

    (Needless to say, most people on this planet couldn't care less), and

    we all realize the Web has a lot of misinformation.

    (a) Nevertheless, I discovered that some people (rightly or wrongly)

    feel that "go to sleep" is an example of verb + prepositional phrase.

    (b) "I was afraid to go to sleep." Some felt = p.p.

    "I was afraid to sleep." Some felt = infinitive.

    (c) One "expert" cited: "Go back to sleep" as an example of "back" being

    used with a "prepositional phrase."

    (4) I checked my 1952 edition of Funk & Wagnalls New Standard

    Dictionary of the English Language. It listed all the noun uses, and then

    it gave this phrase:

    to go to sleep = to fall asleep

    (5) When you say, "Go to sleep," it seems that you are saying:

    Start sleeping. In other words, "sleep" seems to be a state. And

    I believe that a state can qualify as a noun.

    *****

    It would be great if native speakers and learners were to

    give us their opinions. In fact, how do other languages analyze

    "go to sleep"?

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

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