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    • Join Date: Aug 2009
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    #1

    match with

    can " match" be used in intransitive form? is it correct to say

    my shoes do not match with the shirt.

    thanks

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: match with

    I would say it without the "with" -- in other words, transitively.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: match with

    Barb_D is correct. Perhaps you have met the expression go with:

    My shoes do not go with my shirt.

    This has a different meaning. Match in your example has the idea of have the same colour, pattern, style as. Go with has the idea of comine well with.

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