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    #1

    be quick in the uptake

    Dear teachers,

    Would you tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    She was not at all shy, she asked me to call her Sally before we’d known one another ten minutes, and she was quick in the uptake. (W. S. Maugham, “Complete Short Stories”)

    be quick in the uptake = be quick to grasp

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V

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    #2

    Re: be quick in the uptake

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    She was not at all shy, she asked me to call her Sally before we’d known one another ten minutes, and she was quick in the uptake. (W. S. Maugham, “Complete Short Stories”)

    be quick in the uptake = be quick to grasp
    I believe so, although there's not enough context. I know the expression in the form of "quick on the uptake". Perhaps "in" is more formal?

    PS: A person here, says "in" is incorrect, but I am not convinced.

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    #3

    Re: be quick in the uptake

    Hi birdeen's call,

    I know the mentioned of you configuration of the expression in question: Please don’t cast the blame at my door. The “guilt” lies with Maugham alone. I am only a humble translator.

    quick on the uptake - definition of quick on the uptake by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

    Eleanor is very witty and quick on the uptake

    V.

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    #4

    Re: be quick in the uptake

    I may not be able to convince you, BC, but I have never heard or seen 'in', and I consider it 'incorrect'.

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    #5

    Re: be quick in the uptake

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Please don’t cast the blame at my door. The “guilt” lies with Maugham alone.
    I'm not blaming anybody. I would only like to have it cleared up.


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    #6

    Re: be quick in the uptake

    As a native speaker of American English, I would use on. Since Maugham was English, and died over forty year ago, it is likely that his usage was either correct English idiom at the time, or was appropriate for the narrator's voice in that story.

    It usually means quick to learn or comprehend, but in this case we really do need more context, as birdeen said.

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