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    #1

    by virtue of = in virtue of

    Dear teachers,

    Would you tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    He used to travel through Greece by virtue of this fable, which procured him reception in all the towns.

    This they shall attain, partly in virtue of the promise made by God, and partly in virtue of piety.

    He claimed a pension in virtue of his long military service.

    He will set in virtue of his legitimate authority.

    by virtue of = in virtue of = on the grounds of, by reason of

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V
    Last edited by vil; 18-Oct-2010 at 12:05.

  1. philadelphia's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: by virtue of = in the virtue of

    Not a teacher

    Right - I'd add "because of" and "as a result of". BTW, "in virtue of" or "by virtue of" but not "in THE vertue of" (it's just a typo, I think)

  2. Tullia's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: by virtue of = in virtue of

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    by virtue of = in virtue of = on the grounds of, by reason of
    I would say that is a good explanation.

    I would add that when we use "virtue" rather than "reason", it tends to be because the reason is one which is to the credit of the person involved.

    I think it would sound unnatural to say, when talking about an escapee from prison, something like:

    "By virtue of his violence, he was able to subdue the guard and escape."

    That's not a hard and fast rule, of course, and in fact sometimes we might choose to use "virtue" in a very ironic sense.

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