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  1. youandcorey's Avatar
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    #1

    whose

    There was a cat whose tail was long on the chair.

    I want to explain that this is an incorrect sentence, but I need help.

  2. youandcorey's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: whose

    Quote Originally Posted by youandcorey View Post
    There was a cat whose tail was long on the chair.

    I want to explain that this is an incorrect sentence, but I need help.
    There was a cat whose tail was long on the chair.

    Is this an incorrect sentence, because "whose tail was long on the chair" lacks coherent meaning?

    Can anyone help me to explain grammatically why it's incorrect?

    Please!

  3. youandcorey's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: whose



    Thank you Gillnetter for your input!

    Could anyone offer further insight as to how I can explain why #1 is incorrect?

    Here's what I've come up with so far.


    1. There was a cat whose tail was *long on the chair.
    I believe the author wishes to use “whose” to demonstrate that the cat has a long tail and that cat is on the chair.

    The first part is okay - “There was a cat whose tail was very long.”

    But what does "long on the chair" mean?


    There was a cat with a long tail. + There was a cat on the chair.


    The problem with number #1 is that it vaguely sounds like only the cat’s tail was on the chair. This lacks coherent meaning. I recommend the following:

    2. There was a cat whose tail was lying on the chair.
    In this example, we can clearly understand that it is only the cat’s tail on the chair.

    *Long can refer to both distance and time. For example, I was there a long time.
    The first example sentence could mean that the tail of the cat had been on the chair for many hours or days. It could also mean that the tail of the cat was longer (distance) on the chair than at other places (the floor or the lawn).

  4. youandcorey's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: whose

    What is the best way to combine these two sentences?




    There was a cat with a long tail. + There was a cat on the chair.




    Is this the best way?
    There was a cat sitting on a chair whose tail was long.

    Many thanks for kind attention!

    Corey

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