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    #1

    walk somebody off his feet (legs) / at a stretch

    Dear teachers,

    Would you tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    “Poor thing”, said Mrs. Mark. “I’ve walked you off your feet.” (I. Murdock, “The Bell”)

    Tom will walk you off your legs if you go out with him; he thinks nothing of doing thirty miles at a stretch.

    walk somebody off his feet (legs) = waste/ kill somebody walking;

    at a stretch = at one stretch = at one time, during one period

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V

    • Member Info
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    #2

    Re: walk somebody off his feet (legs) / at a stretch

    It means "to wear or tire someome out."'

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