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    #1

    chicken-wing limp

    Hi

    As Mike walked behind the other man his left leg bent outward with a chicken-wing limp that stooped him into being several inches shorter.

    Is it some comparison? I don't get it.

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    #2

    Re: chicken-wing limp

    Quote Originally Posted by GUEST2008 View Post
    Hi

    As Mike walked behind the other man his left leg bent outward with a chicken-wing limp that stooped him into being several inches shorter.

    Is it some comparison? I don't get it.
    Here is an image of a chicken wing, imagine the man's leg bending like that.
    Résultats Google Recherche d'images correspondant à http://justbento.com/files/bento/images/chickenwing-1.jpg

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    #3

    Re: chicken-wing limp

    Hi GUEST2008,


    It is a sport term for example by golf.



    When we say chicken wings we do not mean the kind that we eat and relish. This variety can best be left at home or reserved for a victory dinner. It is the act of letting your arm and your wrist go limp when putting a ball that is known as a chicken wing. It is a bad habit and should be overcome by strict discipline and practice. If this limp action is allowed then your arm will fly up and all the power developed will get dissipated.


    Golfers who do not pay the necessary attention to their swing tend to commit this so called chicken wings. Chopping or slicing will be the result of losing power and executing a chicken wing.

    When we say a chicken wing, this means a bad habit a golfer may be doing when taking a swing. When putting or in a putting game, letting your arm and wrist go limp is what you call a chicken wing.

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 22-Oct-2010 at 18:06.

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    #4

    Re: chicken-wing limp

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Hi GUEST2008,


    It is a sport term for example by golf.



    When we say chicken wings we do not mean the kind that we eat and relish. This variety can best be left at home or reserved for a victory dinner. It is the act of letting your arm and your wrist go limp when putting a ball that is known as a chicken wing. It is a bad habit and should be overcome by strict discipline and practice. If this limp action is allowed then your arm will fly up and all the power developed will get dissipated.


    Golfers who do not pay the necessary attention to their swing tend to commit this so called chicken wings. Chopping or slicing will be the result of losing power and executing a chicken wing.

    When we say a chicken wing, this means a bad habit a golfer may be doing when taking a swing. When putting or in a putting game, letting your arm and wrist go limp is what you call a chicken wing.

    V.
    I don't think this has anything at all to do with golf.

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    #5

    Re: chicken-wing limp

    Knowing English don’t answer for it that you are All-knowing.

    The Dreaded Chicken Wing

    Save the chicken wings for when the game is over! While a basket of chicken wings is a nice after-game snack (that you will work off exercising later, OF COURSE!), they are not recommended while you are taking a swing.

    A "chicken wing" means that you are letting your arm and wrist go limp right at the most important part of the swing - when you hit the putter. When this happens, the golfer's arm flies up in the air, and hence it is called a chicken wing. When you do this, you lose all the power in your swing.

    To avoid the chicken wing, you must keep your grip tight and your arms extended. You may have a tendency to fold them up, and that's a big no-no. You might also be doing this because you're standing too close to the ball. If so, move back a little and see if it feels better.

    Sport Atlas: the World of sport. Simple web business & income for all. Free training.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: chicken-wing limp

    It may well be a term used in golf, but I very much doubt if the OP's question had anything to do with sport.

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    #7

    Re: chicken-wing limp

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    but I very much doubt if the OP's question had anything to do with sport.
    No it didn't. But that answer also helped me in some way.

    Thanks guys!

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    #8

    Re: chicken-wing limp

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post

    When we say a chicken wing, this means a bad habit a golfer may be doing when taking a swing. When putting or in a putting game, letting your arm and wrist go limp is what you call a chicken wing.
    But the post is about a person's leg and a limp- I don't get the golf connection here at all. It's about a severe bend to the leg that affects the person's height considerably. Where's the connection between that and the way you swing a golf club?
    Last edited by Tdol; 23-Oct-2010 at 11:19.

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    #9

    Re: chicken-wing limp

    Here are a question and an answer which in my humble opinion demonstrate very clearly the usage of the expression in question in living English.

    Question:

    Our 14 year old Tennessee Walking Horse stumbled yesterday and drew her right hind leg up like a chicken wing. My wife was on her, so I hopped off my horse, ran over and helped her dismount quickly without letting the horse move. I thought she had broken a leg or something. Anyway, I started going over the leg and found no sensitive spots and after a couple minutes of my rubbing the leg good, she had her weight back on the leg. I walked her around the arena for several minutes with no indication of favoring or limping. I mounted her and rode her around the arena for several minutes with no issues. Is it normal for a horse to cramp up? We had only been riding for about 15 minutes. If yes, what's the best way to prevent this?

    Answer:
    If I'm visualizing that "chicken wing" motion correctly, there are three possibilities that come to mind. One is the spastic movement called "string-halt." Somehow, I tend to doubt that, since string-halt is less frequent in warm weather and is more often seen while backing or turning. Certain toxic plants can trigger string-halt, but it's usually more than a one-time event.
    The second possibility is a mild colic. When a horse gets a bellyache (aka colic), it will sometimes kick at the site of the pain. Again, I have doubts about that being the cause, because it also tends to be more than a one-time event.
    The third -- and to my mind most likely -- cause is a painful insect bite. Just as we will slap at a mosquito or deer fly bite, even the most well-mannered horse will reflexively kick at an insect sting.

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    #10

    Re: chicken-wing limp

    Unless he's just had a serious injury, I would logically assume that this was a permanent problem.

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