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    #1

    aid and abet

    Dear teachers,

    Would you tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences?

    As soon as the road’s clear the police will come for you and this time Dr. John Smith will go with you for aiding and abetting a man wanted on a capital charge. (D. Cusack, “Comets Soon Pass”)

    “This hall isn’t licensed for entertainment,” he shouted, “and these people know it. They’re deliberately breaking the law, and if any of you stay here after I’ve given you fair warning, then you’re aiding and abetting.”

    aid and abet = instigate and promote actively by the fulfillment of a malice aforethought

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: aid and abet

    Not this time, Vil. Concentrate on the aiding

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    #3

    Re: aid and abet

    Hi fivejedjon

    What’s right is right and what’s wrong is wrong.
    I wouldn’t want to take you up on that but I feel called obliged to state my grounds for my strange interpretation of the expression in question.

    Aid and Abet: West's Encyclopedia of American Law (Full Article) from Answers.com

    accomplice = an associate in wrongdoing, especially one who aids or abets another in a criminal act, either as a principal or an accessory.

    Regards,

    V.

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    #4

    Re: aid and abet

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Hi fivejedjon

    What’s right is right and what’s wrong is wrong.
    I wouldn’t want to take you up on that but I feel called obliged to state my grounds for my strange interpretation of the expression in question.

    Aid and Abet: West's Encyclopedia of American Law (Full Article) from Answers.com

    accomplice = an associate in wrongdoing, especially one who aids or abets another in a criminal act, either as a principal or an accessory.

    Regards,

    V.
    I would not argue with that definition of accomplice.
    I am leaving you to have another go at aid and abet, as you usually prefer to try by yourself first. I agree that an accomplice usually aids and abets someone in a criminal act. That does not mean that your definition of aid and abet is necessarily correct.

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