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    • Join Date: Jul 2006
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    #1

    pull

    Hello,

    I've heard the verb to pull in a context suggesting that it was used to mean to destroy (a building). However, I cannot connect this usage to any of the meanings you would generally find in a dictionary. Can somebody help me understand this?

    Thank you

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: pull

    Quote Originally Posted by Englishlanguage View Post
    Hello,

    I've heard the verb to pull in a context suggesting that it was used to mean to destroy (a building). However, I cannot connect this usage to any of the meanings you would generally find in a dictionary. Can somebody help me understand this?

    Thank you
    The phrasal verb "to pull down" is used to mean "to demolish". "The old cinema in the high street was pulled down to make way for a supermarket", for example.


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
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    #3

    Re: pull

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    The phrasal verb "to pull down" is used to mean "to demolish". "The old cinema in the high street was pulled down to make way for a supermarket", for example.
    Thank you for your reply.
    I'm sure pull was used without down, but this usage may have derived from the phrasal verb pull down.
    I'll try to give you more context. WTC business developer stated in a documentary on 9/11 attacks that, after receiving a call from the fire department commander, he said that "the smartest thing to do is pull it" (where "it" refers to one of the towers). Some newspaper articles later reported him as admitting to having decided to demolish the building.
    I know there is some controversy on what he actually meant. It is not my intention to raise any kind of political debate on this forum. I just wanted to figure out how can pull it refer to demolishing a building.

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    #4

    Re: pull

    It's clear enough that he means to pull it down; it's not a standard usage, though it may be used in the trade, but I have no problems with the usage.

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