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    #1

    Smile sentences

    Are the following sentences acceptable?

    (1) Therefore, he basked on the sunny beach to take a sunbath.
    (2) About two hours later, the sun was high up in the sky and he was awoken by the bright sun.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by contiluo View Post
    Are the following sentences acceptable?

    (1) Therefore, he basked on the sunny beach to take a sunbath.
    (2) About two hours later, the sun was high up in the sky and he was awoken by the bright sun.
    The second part of your first sentence is redundant.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by contiluo View Post
    Are the following sentences acceptable?

    (1) Therefore, he basked on the sunny beach to take a sunbath.
    (2) About two hours later, the sun was high up in the sky and he was awoken by the bright sun.
    I agree with Barb_D on the first sentence and was about to disagree on the second, but I decided to look it up. Awoken looked very strange to me and I would have used awakened. It seems that we´re both correct.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: sentences

    I went through the same process!
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by riquecohen View Post
    I agree with Barb_D on the first sentence and was about to disagree on the second, but I decided to look it up. Awoken looked very strange to me and I would have used awakened. It seems that we´re both correct.
    awake awoke awoken
    Last edited by e2e4; 25-Oct-2010 at 22:44.

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    #6

    Re: sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by e2e4 View Post
    awake awoke awoken
    Are you asserting that "awaken" is wrong?

    Why do you continually come along towards the end of a thread and post incorrect information giving the impression that you know better? Have you even followed the argument in the thread?

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    #7

    Re: sentences

    Actually, to my surprise, my dictionary (Merriam Webster) listed:
    awake
    awoke or awaked (! Can you imagine "I awaked at 6 am yesterday"?)
    awoken or awaked -- and does not list "awakened" which is what sounds right to me
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. Senior Member
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    #8

    Re: sentences

    /A learner/

    2. About two hours later, the sun was high up in the sky and he was awoken by the bright sun.
    Can I say this sentence this way
    About two hours later he was awoken by the bright high-up sun.(Sounds much better to me)

    Dear teacher Barb, I have a new surprise for you. Next time you open this-forum-posting window you'll notice that the software doesn't recognise the word awoken in the form "awaked" even though my grammar book say it is a valid form as your had told the same to you. The squirm red line appear under the word "awaked" in the window.

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    #9

    Re: sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Actually, to my surprise, my dictionary (Merriam Webster) listed:
    awake
    awoke or awaked (! Can you imagine "I awaked at 6 am yesterday"?)
    awoken or awaked -- and does not list "awakened" which is what sounds right to me
    I couldn´t agree more about what sounds right. So I just did a quick search and found awakened in every dictionary I checked: Macmillan, Merriam-Webster´s Online, Cambridge Advanced Learner`s and Webster´s New World College Dictionary. Seems our instincts were right.

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    #10

    Re: sentences

    It seems that wake, waken, awake, and awaken are all base verbs.

    Macquaries (Aus) Dictionary says:

    wake / woke or waked(US) / woken or waken(US)
    waken / waken or wakened, woken
    awake / awoke or awaked(US) / awoken or awaken (US)
    awaken / awaken or awakened / awoken

    And it seems not to matter whether it's used transitively or intransitively.
    Personally, I almost invariably use the phrasal verb: wake up / woke up / woken up

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