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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #1

    have/ lay/ send somebody rolling in the aisles

    Dear teachers,

    Would you tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    We locked forward to a school play which would really lay them in the aisles.

    have/ lay/ send somebody rolling in the aisles = carry someone off his feet

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,500
    #2

    Re: have/ lay/ send somebody rolling in the aisles

    No.

    'Have them rolling in the aisles' means 'make them helpless with laughter'.

    Rover

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