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    #1

    work contentiously

    Hello everyone,

    I'd like to ask about the meaning of the phrase "to work contentiously". Here is an example of its usage:

    The most experienced player on the ground, 31-year-old Justin Cicolella, except for a “brain fade” in the last term was elusive and impressive all game. Leader Mark McKenzie played another strong captained game, while 2009 Star Search winner Jarred Allmond and Luke Jarrad worked contentiously.

    Does "to work contentiously" mean "to work hard and carefully"?

  1. Munch's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: work contentiously

    I think it this case it is a mistake. The author meant to write "work conscientiously" which as you said means "to work hard and carefully". They might have only heard the phrase, without understanding the meanings of "contentious" and "conscientious".

    If you google both phrases, you will find a few examples of authors who have made the same mistake, but the correct phrase is far more common.

    Your example came from a small Australian Rules football club website - how did you find it?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 732
    #3

    Re: work contentiously

    Quote Originally Posted by Munch View Post
    I think it this case it is a mistake. The author meant to write "work conscientiously" which as you said means "to work hard and carefully". They might have only heard the phrase, without understanding the meanings of "contentious" and "conscientious".

    If you google both phrases, you will find a few examples of authors who have made the same mistake, but the correct phrase is far more common.

    Your example came from a small Australian Rules football club website - how did you find it?
    First of all thank you for your explanation, Munch.

    Well, I was looking for some information on the net using google and encountered the phrase in question.
    Last edited by KLPNO; 26-Oct-2010 at 14:27.

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